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Album [graphic].
Album belonging to Mary Anne Dickerson, a young middle-class African American Philadelphian, probably created as a pedagogical instrument to promote cultivated expression, with contributions dating from 1833 until 1882. Contains engraved plates depicting scenic views, and original and transcribed poems, prose, essays, and drawings on topics including friendship, motherhood, mortality, youth, death, flowers, female beauty, and refinement. Also contains a one page record of family deaths, marriages, and births with entries up to the birth of Mary Anne's grandson in 1882. Identified contributors are mainly black elite intelligentsia active in the African American anti-slavery, and cultural communities of mid-nineteenth century Philadelphia, New York, and Boston., Contains the following contributions: "The Mother's Joy," a poem by C.F., possibly by abolitionist and second wife of entrepreneur James Forten, Charlotte Vandine Forten; illustration after "The Boroom Slave" and the poem, "To the Album," by artist and activist Robert Douglass; prose, "To Mary Ann", about living a happy life by Philadelphian anti-slavery activist Amy Matilda Cassey; a memorial, "To My Dear Willie," by Mary Anne to her deceased son, William Jones; poem, "The Night of Death," by J.A.J., Mary Anne's husband, John A. Jones; Boston author and civil rights activist William C. Nell's transcription of the poem, "The Rights of Women"; allegorical prose on the meaning of life by New York abolitionist Harriet Forten Purvis; transcription of the poem, "The Pearl Diver," by white Philadelphian anti-slavery activist Arnold Buffum; prose to "Mary Annie" about remembrance by Ada, possibly by anti-slavery activist Sarah Forten Purvis or gentlewoman Ada Howell Hinton; floral drawing by A.H.H., probably by Ada Howell Hinton; prose and floral watercolors by educator, abolitionist, and Quaker Sarah Mapps Douglass, the sister of Robert Douglass; "Lines Addressed to a Wreath of Flowers Designed on a Present for Mary Ann" by E.S. Webb, possibly Elizabeth Susan Webb, sister of novelist Frank J. Webb; and prose by Mary Anne about mortality. Additional entries of prose and poetry by John G. Dutton, E.S. Webb, Lydia A.B., Henrietta, W.F.P, and S.L.C., unattributed entry, "To Esther," and unattributed entry of a floral watercolor. Also contains engraved plates by A.B. Durand, C. Fielding, C.G. Childs, Robert Walter Weir, James Smillie and Thomas Cole entitled respectively, "Falls of the Sawkill"; "Italy, The Bay of Naples"; "Weehawken"; "Delaware Water Gap"; "Catskill Mountains"; "Fort Putnam"; and "Winnipiseogee Lake"., Title supplied by cataloguer., Contains engraved illustrated title page: Album. The Mother's Joy., Blank album published in New York in 1833 by J.C. Ricker., Embossed and gilt morocco binding., Release of Dower document dated 1838 giving the Dickerson home to the surviving children, contemporary unidentified newspaper clippings, manuscript poetry transcriptions, contemporary greeting cards, tradecard, and other miscellaneous loose items removed and housed separately., LCP AR (Annual Report) 1993, p. 17-25., Dickerson, a pupil of African American educator Sarah Mapps Douglass, was the daughter of African American activists, Martin and Adelia Dickerson, and step-father Samuel Van Brackle.

Original & selected poetry &c. [graphic] / Amy Matilda Cassey.
Friendship album of Amy Matilda Cassey, a middle-class African American woman active in the anti-slavery movement and African American cultural community, containing contributions dating from 1833 until 1856. Contains original and transcribed poems, prose, and essays on topics including slavery, womanhood, religion, friendship, female refinement, death, and love. Also contains drawings, watercolors, and gouaches of flowers and a New York residential street scene. Contributors, many women of the African American elite community, are prestigious reformers and abolitionists active in the anti-slavery, intelligentsia, and cultural community of the antebellum North including Philadelphia, New York, Boston, and Baltimore., Contains the following contributions: entry by African American abolitionist Frederick Douglass, dated Philadelphia 1850, about his "coarse" contribution in an album of "refined" entries; an original sonnet, "Fallen Bird," and essay, "The Abolition Cause," by anti-slavery activist, author, and editor, William Lloyd Garrison, dated Philadelphia 1833; floral watercolors and calligraphed poems by Philadelphia Quaker activist, educator, and artist Sarah Mapps Douglass; essay, "Moral Reform," dated Philadelphia 1834, by Harrisburg businessman and activist William Whipper; calligraphed version of Washington Irving's poem, "The Wife," by New York African American engraver Patrick Henry Reason dated New York 1839; poem about "Friendship" dated 1837 by anti-slavery activist and gentleman, Robert Purvis; prose on faith penned in 1853 by women right's activist and abolitionist Lucy Stone; floral watercolors, poems and prose on friendship, womanhood, abolition, and remembrance by Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society associates Margaretta Forten, Mary Forten, Sarah Forten Purvis, Rebecca Buffum, Susan C. Wright, and Hannah L. Stickney; memorials to his deceased wife and daughter by Baltimore African Methodist Episcopal Bishop Daniel Alexander Payne written in 1849; and an essay by abolitionist Reverend Isiah George DeGrasse dated Bridgewater 1836. Additional contributions by Baltimore gentlewoman and anti-slavery activist Emily Willson; anti-slavery activist Ann Warren Weston; Philadelphia barber and activist John Chew; abolitionist James Miller M'Kim; University of Glasgow trained activist James McCune Smith; Boston reformer Wendell Phillips; C.L.R., possibly Charles L. Reason, abolitionist and brother of engraver Patrick Henry Reason; A.W.H., possibly Quaker abolitionist Anna W. Hopper, and E.G., possibly Quaker abolitionist Elizabeth Garrigues., Also includes sketches and a poem by Lydia A. Bowser and unattributed watercolors and sketches possibly by Amy Matilda Cassey., Embossed and gilt morocco binding with blue moiré silk doublures., LCP AR (Annual Report) 1998, p. 25-35., Cassey, an abolitionist, temperance and civil rights activist and founding member of the interracial Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society and the African American literary and science society, Gilbert Lyceum, was the daughter of New York black community leader, Reverend Peter Williams. She was the wife of Philadelphia businessman and civil rights activist Joseph Cassey, and later married Boston anti-slavery lecturer Charles Lenox Remond.

[Residential New York street]
Album page containing a drawing of a residential New York Street scene with a traveller on horseback conversing with a man near a house., Title supplied by cataloguer., Possibly by Amy Matilda Cassey.

[Scrapbook of ephemera]
Scrapbook containing tickets, invitations, textile and perfume labels, tokens, and trade cards, primarily issued in Philadelphia. Contents include images of buildings, genre scenes, and allegorical figures. Many of the items also include ornate borders. Materials document University of Pennsylvania medical department courses; a picnic at Mr. John F. Parke’s Grove (1853); Pennsylvania Horticultural Society events, including admittance for a "Lady to the Stated Meetings", bazaars, and Christmas Eve party; the Baltimore Assemblies; admittance to the Great Central Fair (1864) and Hillebrand & Lewis Gymnastic Institute; Mr. & Mrs. John A. McAllister Wooden Wedding (1861-1866); and a shooting match at glass balls at Union Hotel (1881). Scrapbook also contains advertising souvenirs from the Centennial Exhibition (1876); trade cards for Pennsylvania and Atlantic coast businesses; a calling card for Joseph E. Francis annotated with ink sketched figures; landscape views with a fishing scene, and a locomotive; receipts issued for pew rent to St. Paul’s Church, membership to the Athenaeum, and fines owed to the Library Company (1848); and an illustrated check for the Hibernian Society, billhead for T. Sharpless & Sons, and advertisement for [Edwin S.] Johnston’s New Self Locking Clock Spring Shade Roller., Other Philadelphia businesses represented include S.A. Hagner, saddle harness and trunk manufactory; John Dorff, silver plater and gilder; Sheble, Smith & Co., successors to R.L. Barnes, map publishers and mounters; Godey’s Lady’s Book Publishing Company; Geo. J. Burns, printer; Smith & Co. Globe Bazaar auction house; Johnson & Smith, type founders (formerly Binney & Ronaldson); and John H. Brown & Co., dry goods. Non-Philadelphia businesses include Cataract House (Niagara Falls); Globe Hotel (New York); Wilmington Boarding School for Girls (Samuel Hilles); Ash’s Patent Five Slit United States Government Pen; E. Kenny, architect (Brooklyn); Works of P. & F. Corbin (New Britain, Ct.); T. H. Pollock, organ builder and David B. Prosser, saddles and harness (Richmond); M'Neal & Siegert, jeweler; and Gray & Bail, furniture., Red cloth binding, stamped in gilt on cover: Photographs., Some tickets signed by Joseph Leidy, University of Pennsylvania., Some contents inscribed with name of recipient or holder. Recipients and holders include W. J. (John) Holmes; James J. Magee, possibly James Magee, President of Westmoreland Coal Co. who previously worked at Binney & Ronaldson; John Matthews; T. J. Nichols & lady; [H.?]J. Sharpless; and J. C. Stewart., Engravers and printers include Brown (Ledger Building), J. H. Camp, Illman & Sons, Geddes, M. & V. Harrison, J. Lea, W. Eaves, Major & Knapp, and Van Slyck & Co., Cataloging funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-506-19-10), 2010-2012., Housed in phase box.

[Scrapbook of original and printed art works]
Scrapbook containing predominantly original amateur art work, including watercolors, pencil works, and crayon drawings. Also contains engraved illustrations, photographic reproductions of paintings and sculptures, and lithographs. Subjects of the imagery include landscapes and marinescapes; scenes of rural life; portraiture of animals (birds, elephant, pig) and people; figure studies; allegorical figures; the work of Horatio Stone and Hortense Hazard; costume plates from "La France de nos jours" (1860); and religious and sentimental (courtship) scenes. Printed and inscribed titles include The Lion in Love; Masque d'Omphale; Polixene; Pâtre De Se. Saveur; Costumes Des Maconnaises; Costumes Des Bressannes; Une Bacchante; The Risen Redeemer; The Holy Family; The Trusty Servant; The Widow (painted by Smith's cousin J. L. Fisher); Blackbird and Thrush in Covert; Ceres; "The Highland soldier bidding adieu to his love"; "Pig-Pig-Pig"; La Maitress du Titian; and Japan Rose. Scrapbook also includes a crayon rubbing of the monumental brass on the tomb of Sir John Ratcliffe and Dame Alice at Crathwaite Church (Keswick, Cumberland); a series of French etchings satirizing the military; a photograph of the "Arsenal at Vienna"; and a trade card for the Interlaken Grand Hotel Victoria., Title supplied by cataloger., Few items removed., Many items contain corresponding inscriptions (often illegible) by the artist or inscriptions on verso by Smith explicating provenance., Various artists and engravers including P. Planat, H. Richter, W. Froden, Maurice, H. Moses, Hanlon, and G. Fairman., Various printers and publishers including George Baxter, Ducarme, Langlume, Auguste Bry, LeBlond & Co., Leighton Bros., Destouches, and Smith, Elder, & Co., Cataloging funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-506-19-10), 2010-2012.

[Scrapbook of prints]
Scrapbook containing primarily engraved periodical illustrations issued between circa 1820 and 1852 from American publications, including "Wellman's Literary Miscellany" and "Sartain's Magazine." Illustrations predominantly depict sentimental, religious, and genre views, many after European paintings, and often including children and animals, predominantly dogs. Titles include The Village School; Sunday Morning; Samuel & Eli; The Invasion; Early Piety; Sunday Morning; Calumet, or the Christian Indian; Christ Healing the Sick; The Child and the Mastiff; The Reaper's Friend; Hawk and Dove; The Young Tutors; The Farmer's Daughter; Rural Life (Wellman's Literary Miscellany); Innocence and Roguery; The Magic Lake, a scene from The Pilgrim of Love, The Valley of Repose, and The Exiles at Babylon from Sartain's Magazine; The First Friend; and The Sermon on the Mount. Other illustrations, some vignette on mauve-colored paper, depict Philadelphia and regional landmarks, including Schuylkill Near Flat Rock; Gilpin Mills on the Brandywine; Andalusia, the seat of Nicholas Biddle, Esq.; The Residence of the Count de Survilliers (i.e., Joseph Bonaparte) Bordentown; Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia; and Pennsylvania Hospital for the Insane. Also includes a tipped in miniature, embossed die cut of a vase of flowers., Patterned red paper binding., Artists and engravers include William Redmore Bigg; Thomas Birch; Hugh Bridport; J. G. Chapman; Thomas Doughty; George B. Ellis; Jean Augustin Franquelin; Hendemann; Illman & Sons; David G. Johnson; T. Kelley; J. B. Longacre; John B. Neagle; J. Holmes; F. Humphrys; W. Mason; John McArthur; Frederick Richard Pickersgill; J. W. Steel; Stuart & Fowler; W. E. Tucker; Henry Warren; Welch & Walter; Benjamin West; and Franz Winterhalter., Printers and publishers include Benjamin Rogers and Key & Biddle., Contains hand-colored title page printed "On stone by P.S. Duval's Lithy. Phila." and titled "Manchester Print Works. I. P. Wendell & Co. Philadelphia.", Some prints identified with title written in manuscript below image., Cataloging funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-506-19-10), 2010-2012., Housed in phase box., Contains several blank pages, many with glue marks.