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Album [graphic].
Album belonging to Mary Anne Dickerson, a young middle-class African American Philadelphian, probably created as a pedagogical instrument to promote cultivated expression, with contributions dating from 1833 until 1882. Contains engraved plates depicting scenic views, and original and transcribed poems, prose, essays, and drawings on topics including friendship, motherhood, mortality, youth, death, flowers, female beauty, and refinement. Also contains a one page record of family deaths, marriages, and births with entries up to the birth of Mary Anne's grandson in 1882. Identified contributors are mainly black elite intelligentsia active in the African American anti-slavery, and cultural communities of mid-nineteenth century Philadelphia, New York, and Boston., Contains the following contributions: "The Mother's Joy," a poem by C.F., possibly by abolitionist and second wife of entrepreneur James Forten, Charlotte Vandine Forten; illustration after "The Boroom Slave" and the poem, "To the Album," by artist and activist Robert Douglass; prose, "To Mary Ann", about living a happy life by Philadelphian anti-slavery activist Amy Matilda Cassey; a memorial, "To My Dear Willie," by Mary Anne to her deceased son, William Jones; poem, "The Night of Death," by J.A.J., Mary Anne's husband, John A. Jones; Boston author and civil rights activist William C. Nell's transcription of the poem, "The Rights of Women"; allegorical prose on the meaning of life by New York abolitionist Harriet Forten Purvis; transcription of the poem, "The Pearl Diver," by white Philadelphian anti-slavery activist Arnold Buffum; prose to "Mary Annie" about remembrance by Ada, possibly by anti-slavery activist Sarah Forten Purvis or gentlewoman Ada Howell Hinton; floral drawing by A.H.H., probably by Ada Howell Hinton; prose and floral watercolors by educator, abolitionist, and Quaker Sarah Mapps Douglass, the sister of Robert Douglass; "Lines Addressed to a Wreath of Flowers Designed on a Present for Mary Ann" by E.S. Webb, possibly Elizabeth Susan Webb, sister of novelist Frank J. Webb; and prose by Mary Anne about mortality. Additional entries of prose and poetry by John G. Dutton, E.S. Webb, Lydia A.B., Henrietta, W.F.P, and S.L.C., unattributed entry, "To Esther," and unattributed entry of a floral watercolor. Also contains engraved plates by A.B. Durand, C. Fielding, C.G. Childs, Robert Walter Weir, James Smillie and Thomas Cole entitled respectively, "Falls of the Sawkill"; "Italy, The Bay of Naples"; "Weehawken"; "Delaware Water Gap"; "Catskill Mountains"; "Fort Putnam"; and "Winnipiseogee Lake"., Title supplied by cataloguer., Contains engraved illustrated title page: Album. The Mother's Joy., Blank album published in New York in 1833 by J.C. Ricker., Embossed and gilt morocco binding., Release of Dower document dated 1838 giving the Dickerson home to the surviving children, contemporary unidentified newspaper clippings, manuscript poetry transcriptions, contemporary greeting cards, tradecard, and other miscellaneous loose items removed and housed separately., LCP AR (Annual Report) 1993, p. 17-25., Dickerson, a pupil of African American educator Sarah Mapps Douglass, was the daughter of African American activists, Martin and Adelia Dickerson, and step-father Samuel Van Brackle.

The first steamboat on the Missouri.
Album page with pre-printed lithographic border containing a drawing and unattributed poem about the first steamboat on the Missouri from the 1838 edition of "The Token and Atlantic Souvenir." Drawing after Joseph Andrew's engraving of the work by painter John Gadsby Chapman depicts two Native Americans on a rock, one seated, looking forlorn, and the other standing with arms raised in anguish, watching a steamboat in the distance. Poem, "The Indian's Farewell to the Missouri, on seeing the First Steamboat on its Waters," addresses the power of the white man and the steamboat as a harbinger of his usurpation of Native American territories., LCP exhibit catalogue: African American Miscellany p. 45., Douglass, an African American artist and early photographer, was an active member of the Philadelphia anti-slavery and civil rights movement.

[Floral watercolor]
Album page containing a drawing of a rose bud., Probably by gentlewoman Ada Howell Hinton, daughter of Frederick Augustus Hinton, barber, perfumer, abolitionist, and prominent member of the Philadelphia African American elite community.

"Forget me not!"
Album page containing a drawing of a stem of forget-me-not and a poem about remembrance., Title from manuscript verse., Probably by Margaretta or Mary Forten, daughters of Philadelphia African American entrepreneur and activist James Forten, who were members of the interracial Pennsylvania Female Anti-Slavery Society.

Forget me not
Album page with border containing a drawing of forget-me-nots., Douglass, an artist and prominent Quaker member of the Philadelphia African American elite community, was best known as an educator and anti-slavery activist.

Fuchsia
Album page containing a drawing of a stem of fuchsia copied after a plate from James Andrews' Lessons in Flower Painting. A Series...(London: Charles Tilt, Fleet Street; John Menzies, Edinburgh; Thomas Wardle, Philadelphia [1836]), pl. 11. (LCP Am 1836 And, 13878.Q)., LCP exhibit catalogue: African American Miscellany p.45., Douglass, an artist and prominent Quaker member of the Philadelphia African American elite community, was best known as an educator and community activist.

"I love a flower!"
Album page containing a drawing of a wild pink rose and eight lines of allegorical verse about the beauty of flowers., Title from manuscript verse., Douglass, an artist and prominent Quaker member of the Philadelphia African American elite community, was best known as an educator and anti-slavery activist.

[Lily watercolor and poem]
Album page containing an unattributed drawing of a purple lily and a four-line poem about friendship., Title supplied by cataloguer.

"Long long be thy heart with your memory fill'd..."
Album page containing a drawing of a vase of flowers and a poem about remembrance., Title from manuscript verse., Forten, a member of the interracial Pennsylvania Female Anti-Slavery Society, was the daughter of Philadelphia African American entrepreneur and activist James Forten.

A mark of friendship's pleasing power...
Album page with border containing a drawing depicting a bunch of flowers and an unattributed four-line sentimental poem about friendship and rememberance., Title from manuscript verse., Probably by Ada Howell Hinton, daughter of Frederick Augustus Hinton, barber, perfumer, abolitionist and prominent member of the Philadelphia African American elite community.

No marvel woman should love flowers...
Album page containing a drawing of red and blue flowers and six lines of allegorical verse about unappreciated beauty., Title from manuscript verse., Douglass, an artist and prominent Quaker member of the Philadelphia African American elite community, was best known as an educator and anti-slavery activist.

Original & selected poetry &c.
Album belonging to Martina Dickerson, a young middle-class African American Philadelphian, probably created as a pedagogical instrument to promote cultivated expression, with twenty-two contributions dating from 1840 until around 1846. Contains original and transcribed poems, prose, and essays on topics including love, friendship, sympathy, courage, and female refinement. Also includes drawings, primarily of flowers. Identified contributors are mainly black elite intelligentsia active in the African American anti-slavery and cultural community of mid-nineteenth century Philadelphia., Contains the following contributions: calligraphed title page by abolitionist James Forten, Jr.; prose on "Literature," "The Album," and "The Year" by entrepeneur and abolitionist James Forten, Sr. or his son, James, Jr.; prose entitled "Perserverance" by tailor, abolitionist, and civil rights activist John C. Bowers; prose, sketches, and watercolors by Quaker abolitionist, educator, and artist, Sarah Mapps Douglass; watercolor and transcribed poem, "The First Steamboat on the Missouri," by Sarah's brother, artist, community activist, and abolitionist, Robert Douglass; essay entitled "Sympathy" by William Douglass, pastor and historian of the St. Thomas Episcopal Church in Philadelphia; transcription from Wordsworth's "Excursion" by educator and anti-slavery activist Charles L. Reason; gouache of a bunch of flowers by A.H.H., probably Ada Howell Hinton, an African American gentlewoman; and prose, poems, and gouache by Mary M. MacFarland, V.E. Macarty, Y.J. Grice, Rebecca F. Peterson, H.D. Shorter, C.D.R., and J.F.V., Embossed and gilt morocco binding., Lithograph title page, "Flowers," containing flower illustration hand-colored with gouache and watercolor., Blank album published in London by Wm. & Hy. Rock., LCP AR (Annual Report) 1993, p. 17-25., Dickerson, a pupil of African American educator Sarah Mapps Douglass, was the daughter of African American activists, Martin and Adelia Dickerson, and step-father Samuel Van Brackle.

Original & selected poetry &c. [graphic] / Amy Matilda Cassey.
Friendship album of Amy Matilda Cassey, a middle-class African American woman active in the anti-slavery movement and African American cultural community, containing contributions dating from 1833 until 1856. Contains original and transcribed poems, prose, and essays on topics including slavery, womanhood, religion, friendship, female refinement, death, and love. Also contains drawings, watercolors, and gouaches of flowers and a New York residential street scene. Contributors, many women of the African American elite community, are prestigious reformers and abolitionists active in the anti-slavery, intelligentsia, and cultural community of the antebellum North including Philadelphia, New York, Boston, and Baltimore., Contains the following contributions: entry by African American abolitionist Frederick Douglass, dated Philadelphia 1850, about his "coarse" contribution in an album of "refined" entries; an original sonnet, "Fallen Bird," and essay, "The Abolition Cause," by anti-slavery activist, author, and editor, William Lloyd Garrison, dated Philadelphia 1833; floral watercolors and calligraphed poems by Philadelphia Quaker activist, educator, and artist Sarah Mapps Douglass; essay, "Moral Reform," dated Philadelphia 1834, by Harrisburg businessman and activist William Whipper; calligraphed version of Washington Irving's poem, "The Wife," by New York African American engraver Patrick Henry Reason dated New York 1839; poem about "Friendship" dated 1837 by anti-slavery activist and gentleman, Robert Purvis; prose on faith penned in 1853 by women right's activist and abolitionist Lucy Stone; floral watercolors, poems and prose on friendship, womanhood, abolition, and remembrance by Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society associates Margaretta Forten, Mary Forten, Sarah Forten Purvis, Rebecca Buffum, Susan C. Wright, and Hannah L. Stickney; memorials to his deceased wife and daughter by Baltimore African Methodist Episcopal Bishop Daniel Alexander Payne written in 1849; and an essay by abolitionist Reverend Isiah George DeGrasse dated Bridgewater 1836. Additional contributions by Baltimore gentlewoman and anti-slavery activist Emily Willson; anti-slavery activist Ann Warren Weston; Philadelphia barber and activist John Chew; abolitionist James Miller M'Kim; University of Glasgow trained activist James McCune Smith; Boston reformer Wendell Phillips; C.L.R., possibly Charles L. Reason, abolitionist and brother of engraver Patrick Henry Reason; A.W.H., possibly Quaker abolitionist Anna W. Hopper, and E.G., possibly Quaker abolitionist Elizabeth Garrigues., Also includes sketches and a poem by Lydia A. Bowser and unattributed watercolors and sketches possibly by Amy Matilda Cassey., Embossed and gilt morocco binding with blue moiré silk doublures., LCP AR (Annual Report) 1998, p. 25-35., Cassey, an abolitionist, temperance and civil rights activist and founding member of the interracial Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society and the African American literary and science society, Gilbert Lyceum, was the daughter of New York black community leader, Reverend Peter Williams. She was the wife of Philadelphia businessman and civil rights activist Joseph Cassey, and later married Boston anti-slavery lecturer Charles Lenox Remond.

[Residential New York street]
Album page containing a drawing of a residential New York Street scene with a traveller on horseback conversing with a man near a house., Title supplied by cataloguer., Possibly by Amy Matilda Cassey.

[Rose with open scroll]
Album page containing an incomplete drawing of a spray of red rose behind a blank open scroll., Title supplied by cataloguer., Possibly by Amy Matilda Cassey.

"A token of love from me, to thee"
Album page containing a drawing of a black butterfly on a twig with flowers., Title from manuscript note., Douglass, an artist and prominent Quaker member of the Philadelphia African American elite community, was best known as an educator and anti-slavery activist.

[Vase of flowers]
Album page containing a drawing of a vase of flowers., Title supplied by cataloguer., Possibly by Amy Matilda Cassey.

[Vase of flowers]
Album page with border containing a drawing of a vase of flowers., Title supplied by cataloguer., Douglass, an artist and prominent Quaker member of the Philadelphia African American community, was best known as an educator and anti-slavery activist.

The Wife. By Washington Irving.
Album page containing an ornately calligraphed transcription of the Irving poem about the wife as a helpmate to her husband., Reason, an African American New York engraver, was one of the only successful blacks engravers during the 1830s and 1840s.