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[Advertisements from Rae's Philadelphia pictorial directory & panoramic advertiser. Chestnut Street, from Second to Tenth Streets]
Advertisements predominantly for sponsoring businesses not located on Chestnut Street, including George S. Storr's Chemical Hair Invigorator, No. 68 North Eighth Street; H. P. & W. C. Taylor, Manufacturers of the Only Real Transparent Soap, Ninth, between Green & Coates Street; E. G. A. Baker, Manufacturing Jeweler, Northeast corner Branch & Fourth Streets; T. L. Buckingham, Dentist, 162 Race Street, below Fifth; music publisher Lee & Walker, 162 Chestnut Street; and C. G. Henderson & Co. Philadelphia Central Book & Stationery Warehouse, 164 Chestnut Street. Most of the advertisements contain several lines of promotional text. Storr's text details the results of use of the product, including prevention of premature grayness and improved disposition of curled hair; testimonials; and a word of caution about impostors. Lee & Walker promote their title list, including asterisked items containing a lithograph cover. Henderson & Co. notes the "aim of proprietors to sell at the lowest rates"; "the Beauty and Elegance of Its Pictorial Department"; and their stationery merchandise. Taylor advertisement promotes their award wining and new varieties of soap, as well as contains a wood engraving of the exterior of the factory on the 600 block of North Ninth Street. Image includes a train traveling toward the building and pedestrians and a patron in front of the building., Title supplied by cataloger., Cataloging funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-506-19-10), 2010-2012., Folder 18.

[Advertisements from Rae's Philadelphia pictorial directory & panoramic advertiser. Chestnut Street, from Second to Tenth Streets]
Advertisements for sponsoring businesses depicted and not located on Chestnut Street, including Dr. D. Jayne's Family Medicines, 84 Chestnut Street; The Public Ledger Offices, Third & Chestnut; Dr. William Young's The Pocket Aesculapius; Or, Every One His Own Physician, No. 152 Spruce Street, Philadelphia; and E. Ketterlinus' Fancy Printing & Lithographic Establishment, No. 40 North Fourth Street, below Arch. Advertisements contain several lines of advertising text. Jayne's advertisement contains promotions about his medical background, wide distribution, and scientific preparations of his medicines; endorsements; and descriptions of his vermifuge, alterative, balsam, pills, hair tonic and dye, and ague pills. Public Ledger advertisement includes subscription and advertising prices for the Public Ledger; subscription prices for The Dollar Newspaper; and promotion of the variety of printed works executed by the Job & Fancy Steam Printing Establishment. Young advocates his text as comprised of prescriptions to prevent "Victims of Quakery" and Ketterlinus advertises his "Fancy Embossed and Gilt Perfumery Labels, Book & Box Covers; Cornucopia, wine, Liquor & Syrup Labels, always on Hand and Printed to Order. Manufacturer's orders for every description of Fancy & Plain Labels, Tickets, &c., &c., will meet with prompt attention. Embossed Cards, Show Cards and Fancy Glazed Papers of Every Variety. Letter Press & Lithographic Drawing & Printing in Plain & Fancy Colors." Public Ledger Office advertisement printed by Brown, Printer, Ledger Building, Phila., Title supplied by cataloger., Cataloging funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-506-19-10), 2010-2012., Folder 19.

Doct. Hoofland's celebrated German bitters, for the permanent cure of liver complaint, jaundice, dyspepsia, nervous debility, asthma, disease of the kidneys, and all diseases arising from a disordered liver or stomach
Label for the patent medicine showing a medieval scene in the wilderness. Depicts a medieval soldier leaning against a tree and his shield. An ax and club rest beneath him. The soldier wears a pony tail and chest plate. Also contains advertising text in German in the side borders. The bitters, named after the German physician Christoph Wilhem Hoofland (Hufeland), entered the United States market in the 1840s., Printed in lower border: Genuine Signed. C.M. Jackson. Philadelphia., Date of printing based on business address advertised., C. M. Jackson began marketing bitters in the United States about 1848. He operated from 418 Arch Street 1858-1859, and then 631 Arch Street. Jones & Evans assumed operations of the office and factory circa 1862., Cataloging funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-506-19-10), 2010-2012.

Hoofland's German bitters, a pure tonic.
Advertisement for the patent medicine showing a medieval scene. Depicts a bearded monk, outside, on his knees, using a bellows to stoke a fire beneath a hanging cauldron in a hearth. A large volume of text lays open, near greenery, in front of him. The bitters, named after the German physician Christoph Wilhem Hoofland (Hufeland), entered the United States market in the 1840s., Cataloging funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-506-19-10), 2010-2012.

[Scrapbook with periodical illustrations, comic valentines, and patent medicine advertisements]
Eccentrically-arranged scrapbook predominantly containing newspaper clippings, patent medicine almanac advertisements, and comic valentines. Also contains scraps, trade cards, and labels. Clippings, many published in the sensational periodicals “National Police Gazette” and “Days' Doings” primarily depict illustrations of murders and violence, crimes and punishments, human curiosities, animal attacks, human peril, women in distress, evocative theatrical performances, acts of daring, cross dressing and comic scenes in silhouette. Illustrations include H. P. Peer's 1879 jump from the Niagara Falls bridge and a fight between the elephant "Bolivar" and a camel in Van Amburgh's menagerie. Patent medicine advertisements primarily promote the products of Barker's Horse, Cattle, and Poultry Powder; C. I. Hood's Sarsaparilla; Dr. Morse's Indian Root Pill; and E. S. Well's Rough on Rats. Valentines satirize various professions and gender and ethnic stereotypes, including a cook, music teacher, machinist, hatter, seamstress, “French nurse –(from Ireland)”; “novel reader,” “prudish young woman,” and “an old bore.” Also contains some sentimental and genre imagery, including mothers and children, children playing, and pets; landscape and cityscape illustrations; African American caricatures; Tobin trade cards depicting comical views of baseball players; an advertisement for The Electric Era/ German Electric Belt Agency (Brooklyn, N.Y.); Dalziel Brother illustrations of scenes from popular Charles Dickens novels like “Nicholas Nickleby”; chromoxylograph illustration from Aunt Matilda series “The Little Deserter” (McLoughlin Bros., ca. 1869); illustrated children's book covers; and a finely-designed chromolithographic advertisement depicting allegorical figures, flowers, and produce to promote gardens (Lowell, Mass.)., Small number of pages contain hand-coloring., Also originally included tucked-in partial editions of N.Y. newspapers issued in 1890. Issues housed in mylar and with scrapbook., Scrap depicting two racing horses and their jockeys pasted on back cover., Housed in phase box.