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107 W. School Lane. Bought in 1810 for faculty of Academy.
Exterior view of north front of dwelling built in 1810 for faculty of Germantown Academy. Identified in some sources as the residence of James Matthew. Also depicts two men riding past the house on bicycles., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

4821 Main St.
Exterior view of front facade and south side., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

5011 Main St.
Exterior view of front facade of the Royal House, with a horse standing in front of the property. Named for Jacob S. Royal, a victualler who purchased the property in 1853. Converted to accommodate a store and apartments circa 1900. George H. Marsden's grocery store occupies the first floor., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

5112-14 Main St.
Exterior view of front facade of house. Includes John Harris's furniture shop which occupies the ground floor of 5114 Main Street (i.e. Germantown Avenue)., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

5112-5114 Main St.
Exterior view of east fronts of the adjoining houses. Includes the furniture shop of John Harris which occupies the ground floor of 5114 Main Sreet (i.e. Germantown Avenue). Wooden chairs and tables sit near the entrance to the shop., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

5140 Main St. Occupied by Gilbert Stuart 1794-5. Studio in rear.
Exterior view of front facade of house set back from the street and surrounded by bare trees., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount., Also identified as the William Wynn Wister House.

5151 Main St. Home of Phil. R. Freas and first office of the Village Telegraph, later Germantown Telegraph.
Exterior view of front facade of dwelling once home to Philip R. Freas, who established the Village Telegraph (i.e. Germantown Telegraph) in 1830. His office was in the small building next door. Edward Albert's produce shop occupies the old dwelling in this photograph. Includes Samuel Gordon's boot shop at 5149 1/2 Main Street (i.e. Germantown Avenue). Pedestrians browse the shops along the block., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

5203-5205 Main St. Home of Dr. Theodore Ashmead and Dr. Belton. Owen Wister born here July 14,1860.
Exterior view of front facade of dwelling. Known as the birthplace of Owen Wister, a famous author. His family resided here circa 1860 while his family's home was being constructed at 5253 Main Street., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

5242-44 Main St., formerly Indian Queen Hotel.
Exterior view of front facade of former Indian Queen Inn, opened in 1809 by Michael Riter. Image includes Finninger's Ice Cream and Fancy Cakes which occupies the store front at 5242 Main Street (i.e. Germantown Avenue)., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

5261 Main St. Built by John Wister 1744.
Exterior view of west front and north side of Grumblethorpe, house built in 1744 by Philadelphia wine merchant John Wister. His house was the first in Germantown built solely for summer residency and greatly exceeded the dimensions of the homes around it, giving it the nickname "Wister's Big House.", Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

5275-7 Main St. Occupied by Thos. Jefferson in 1793 & Edmund Randolph.
Exterior view of front facade of the Clarkson-Watson House, built circa 1745 for Matthew Clarkson, a merchant and mayor of Philadelphia from 1792 to 1796. Thomas Jefferson and Edmund Randolph stayed here during the yellow fever epidemic of 1793. The Bank of Germantown occupied the property from 1825 to 1869. John Fanning Watson, author of Annals of Philadelphia, also lived here. Includes a partial view of the neighboring business at 5275 Main Street (i.e. Germantown Avenue) owned by Chas. M. Stefken., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

5300 Main St. at present parsonage of Trinity Luth. Church. Formerly Sauer's property. In cellar first type case in America 1772.
View of the south flank and east front of the Sower House, built in three stages: the rear ell circa 1723, the front section circa 1755 and the union of these two sections circa 1795. Owned by the Sower (Sauer) family, who purportedly created the first type cast in America in the basement of this house in 1772-73. Owned by the Trinity Lutheran Church since 1836 and used as a church house since 1950., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

5430 Main St. Home of Capt. Albert Ashmead.
Exterior view of east front of dwelling of Captain Albert Ashmead, built before 1796. Albert's grandfather, William Ashmead, manufactured Germantown wagons in the rear of the property. Main house was used as a show room and was later turned into residence after Albert Ashmead's marriage. Includes a banner hanging in between 5430 and 5434 Main Street ( i.e. Germantown Avenue), advertising John A. Foley's Manheim Stables & Riding Academy at 5434 Main Street., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

5434 Main St. Home of John Ashmead.
Exterior view of east front of residence of William Ashmead, built in 1740 and later owned by his son John Ashmead. Image depicts the site when it was under the ownership of the Manheim Stables & Riding Academy, and contains a partial view of a banner advertising the stables and academy., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

5450 Main St. Built 1790. Home of Thos. Armat.
Exterior view of east front of house built circa 1790. Purchased by merchant and philanthropist Thomas Armat in 1807. Armat resided here until his death in 1831. His family owned the property until 1841. The home was later occupied by Dr. William Ashmead., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount., Thomas Armat was one of the founders of St. Luke's Episcopal Church and donated the land on which the church was built. He also had Loudoun constructed for his only son, Thomas Wright Armat in 1801.

5845 Main St. Standing at time of Revolution.
Exterior view of west front of the 18th-century residence converted into a storefront. Hats are displayed in the storefront. Includes a partial view of display in Sample Shoe's adjoining storefront., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

6019 Main St. Old Green Tree Tavern, once kept by Daniel & Sarah Pastorius until his death in 1754. Shows also 6021 & 23.
Exterior view of west front and south side of tavern built in 1748 by Daniel and Sarah Pastorius adjacent to the homestead of his grandfather Francis Daniel Pastorius. Includes partial views of properties north of the old tavern. Building was moved north in 1930 for the expansion of the First Methodist Episcopal Church of Germantown and used as church offices. Also known as the Saddler's Arms, The Hornet's Nest, and Mackinett's Tavern., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

6205 Main St., built by Dirck Keyser 1738. 1st 2-story house in Germantown.
Exterior view of west front of house built by Dirck Keyser, a Mennonite preacher and silk merchant who immigrated from Amsterdam in 1688. Demolished in 1950 for a supermarket., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

6211 Main St.
Exterior view of west front., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

6305 Main St.
Exterior view of west front of house, including a partial view of the front facade of 6307 Main Street ( i.e. Germantown Avenue)., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., Identified by some sources as the Dorsey House.

American, Hawaian, Cuban flags displayed on Market St. at the outbreak of Spanish War.
Depicts two men in caps talking to each other on the sidewalk. A gentleman in a bowler walks past them on the left. To the right is a partial view of a trolley-car. Both sides of the street are visible in the background. American and Cuban flags are displayed on both sides of the street., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Among the Berkshire Hills.
Among the Berkshire Hills.
Depicts a man driving a buggy with two horses down a very narrow dirt road, surrounded by unspoiled verdant countryside., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount., Label on mount reads: Loaned to the Photographic Society of Philadelphia.

Battle of Germantown Monument, Vernon Park.
Depicts the monument commemorating the Battle of Germantown in Vernon Park, flanked by benches and an old willow in the background, looking toward Germantown Avenue. Horse-carts, automobiles and pedestrians line the street., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

A Berkshire road. 1888.
A Berkshire road. 1888.
Depicts a slender young woman, her sleeves rolled up, wearing an apron over her long skirt and a bonnet, carrying a spray of flowers in her left hand and a basket over her right arm. She stands in a narrow dirt road., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Billmyer House, 1727, N.E. Main & Upsal Sts.
Exterior view of south side and front elevation of house built in 1727 for the Deshler family. In 1788 German printer, Michael Billmyer, bought the property and continued his printing trade from the dwelling., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Birthplace of David Rittenhouse, born 1732. On Lincoln Drive, Germantown.
Exterior view of the residence from Lincoln Drive. David Rittenhouse was born in this house in 1732. Built circa 1770 by William Rittenhouse as part of a complex occupied by the first paper making business in the colonies., Slide number 123., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Blair House, 6043 Main St. First 3 story house, 1775. In 1851 owned by Charlotte Cushman the actress.
Exterior view of west front of house built circa 1750 and purchased by Dr. William Shippen as a summer residence in 1775. Dr. Samuel Blair, Shippen's son-in-law and president of Princeton University, also lived here. House was later occupied by the Pennsylvania Manual Labor School under the direction of Dr. George Junkin. Also owned by actress Charlotte Cushman., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount., Also known as The Laurens.

Blair House, Main & Walnut Ln. Built 1775 by Dr. Wm. Shippen, occupied also by his son in law. Rev. Saml. Blair afterward President of Princeton University.
Exterior view of west front and south side of house built circa 1750 and purchased by Dr. William Shippen as a summer residence in 1775. Dr. Samuel Blair, Shippen's son-in-law and president of Princeton University , also lived here. House was later occupied by the Pennsylvania Manual Labor School under the direction of Dr. George Junkin. Also owned by actress Charlotte Cushman., Slide number 66., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., Also known as The Laurens.

Branchtown Hotel, York Road and Church Lane. Built by Joseph Spencer 1790.
Exterior view of the Branchtown Hotel built by Joseph Spencer in 1790, opposite the dwelling built by him in 1748., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Broad St. looking N. from Filbert, showing the four churches on 4 corners of Arch St.
Depicts men walking and bicycling along North Broad Street, near Arch Street. The four churches near the intersection of Broad and Arch Streets are visible, including the Arch Street Methodist Episcopal Church, First Baptist Church, Lutheran Church of the Holy Communion and the Masonic Temple. Includes the Fidelity Mutual Life Insurance Company building in the background., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Building in rear of the Johnson house, Washington Lane.
Exterior view of ivy-covered, stone outbuilding in the rear of the Johnson house, showing two four story, brick apartment buildings in the background. Divided from the Johnson homestead by a stone wall., Slide number 77., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount., Johnson house built 1765-1768 by master builder Jacob Knor and occupied by John Johnson during the Battle of Germantown. The house sustained damage in the battle, including a hole in the parlor door caused by a cannon ball and a chipped corner of the house above the fence. Served as a station on the Underground Railroad.

Built by Jos. Spencer 1746. N. side Old York Road opposite Church Lane. Sold to Dr. Benneville in 1758 & named Silver Farm.
Exterior view of dilapidated dwelling, surrounded by weeds at the northeast corner of Old York Road and Church Lane. Built in 1746 by Joseph Spencer, purchased by Dr. Benneville in 1758 and named "Silver Pine Farm" by Benneville's son., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Canal near Bridgeport below Norristown, Pa.
Depicts large industrial buildings with smoke stacks on the opposite bank of the canal near Bridgeport, below Norristown, Pennsylvania. Telegraph poles line the canal in the distance and trees and shrubs are in leaf in the foreground., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Capt. Barrow's House, 5106 Main St.
Exterior view of front facade and north side, including a man walking in front of the house. For sale sign posted underneath first floor window. Built 1794-1803 and occupied by Commodore James Barron from 1839 to 1845 while he was in command of the Philadelphia Naval Yard., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Carlton, from the east. Washington's Headquarters 1777.
Exterior view of the north front of the Carlton Mansion, taken from the east. Purportedly named after an English castle inhabited by Queen Elizabeth I. The original house was destroyed by the British in 1777 but rebuilt in 1780 by Isaac Tustin. Served as Washington's Headquarters for a few weeks before and after the Battle of Brandywine. Purchased by Cornelius S. Smith in May of 1840 and later bequeathed to his children., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., Also known as the Carlton-Smith Mansion.

Carlton, north side, near Midvale Ave. Washington's Headquarters 1777.
Exterior view of the north front of the Carlton Mansion, taken from the west. Purportedly named after an English castle inhabited by Queen Elizabeth I. The original house was destroyed by the British in 1777 but rebuilt in 1780 by Isaac Tustin. Served as Washington's Headquarters for a few weeks before and after the Battle of Brandywine. Purchased by Cornelius S. Smith in May of 1840 and later bequeathed to his children., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., Also known as the Carlton-Smith Mansion.

[[The]] Castle. Built 1812 [sic]. State in Schuylkill fish house below Graysferry. Old fishing club. Founded 1732.
Exterior view of the clubhouse known as The Castle of the Fishing Company of the State in Schuylkill, erected in 1732. Association formed for hunting and fishing, purportedly on the old estate of William Warner on the western bank of the Schuylkill River, below Gray's Ferry. Construction of the Fairmount Dam circa 1880 forced the clubhouse to find another home across the river on Rambo's Rock., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Chelten Ave. Station P.R.R. Just before it was raised [sic] 1-1916.
Exterior view of the Pennsylvania Railroad's original Chelten Avenue Station looking north along the tracks. Includes two men working on the tracks. Image taken before the old station was razed in 1916., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Chew House, Germantown, Pa.
Exterior view of west front of Cliveden, built 1763-1767 after designs by Jacob Knor for Benjamin Chew. Fortified by British troops commanded by Colonel Musgrave during the Battle of Germantown. Site of the turning point in the battle. Chew family residence until 1972 when acquired by National Trust for Historic Preservation., Slide number 92., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Chew House, Main & Johnson Sts.
Exterior view of west front of Cliveden, including an addition in the background. Dwelling built 1763-1767 after designs by Jacob Knor for Benjamin Chew., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Christ Church burying ground. 5th & Arch Sts. Phila.
Depicts the opening in the brick wall of Christ Church cemetery that exposes the grave of Benjamin Franklin near the southeast corner of 5th and Arch Streets. The scene is viewed from the northwest corner of the intersection. Several pedestrians are visible in the foreground, one of whom is looking at Franklin's grave., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Christopher Ludwig house, Haines Street.
Depicts the stone dwelling of Christopher Ludwig sitting very close to the dirt road. Ludwig was appointed Baker General to the American Army in 1777., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Clock tower of Independence Hall, Philada.
Depicts the bell tower of Independence Hall looking west. Constructed from 1750 to 1753, about ten years after Andrew Hamilton and Edmund Woolley built the original portion of the building. Bell tower reconstructed by William Strickland in 1828. The mansard roof of the original Public Ledger building is visible in the background., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Concord School House. Built 1775.
Shows the side of the one-room school house completed in 1775 near the Upper Burying Ground at 6309 Germantown Avenue. View includes a tree adorned with a plaque identifying the school in the foreground. The school, built from subscription funds to educate the citizens of the upper end of Germantown, was altered to include a second floor in 1818 to accommodate town meetings., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date from manuscript note on mount., Printed on mount: Plate Hammer; Developer Ortol.

Conyngham-Hacker House, 5214 Main St.
Exterior view of front facade of house built circa 1755 and known successively as the Conyngham, Wister and Hacker House. Also served as the headquarters of the Germantown Historical Society., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount., Also known as the Old Fisher House.

Cope House, Main abv. Johnson St. [sic]
Exterior view of dwelling north of Upsal Street on the west side of Germantown Avenue. Built circa 1730, purchased by Michael Billmeyer in 1793, inherited by his son Daniel Billmeyer in 1831 and descended through the Billmeyer family until 1913., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., Incorrectly identified as the Cope House on Germantown Avenue, north of Johnson Street.

Court of Honor, Peace Jubilee. Oct. 25-28, 1898. Looking north from Locust St. Shows Dundas House cor. Broad & Walnut.
Depicts the Triumphal Arch (i.e. Athenean Arch) and Court of Honor along South Broad Street, showing a large group of pedestrians walking north toward City Hall. Erected after designs by Joseph M. Huston for the Peace Jubilee, a celebration of the end of the Spanish American War in 1898. Included a military parade that passed through the Court of Honor, along with other festivities that lasted several days in October. Also depicts a partial view of the Dundas-Lippincott House at the northeast corner of Broad and Walnut Streets, built 1840-41 after designs by Thomas Ustick Walter., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Cypress planted by John Bartram. In 1830 it was 91 years old, 112 ft. high, 25 ft. in circumference.
Depicts a man standing next to a cypress tree planted by John Bartram on his estate circa 1740. The man is barely visible next to the gigantic tree., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., Dwelling built 1730-1731 and altered in 1770 by botanist John Bartram.

Doorway, N. E. Walnut Lane & Main St.
Exterior detail of front doorway. An ornate iron fence is visible in the foreground. Residence built by the Reverend Samuel Blair for his son Samuel Blair, Jr. in 1806. John Button, manufacturer of hosiery and owner of the Germantown Hosiery Mills, owned the property from 1835 until his death in 1882. His grandson Priestly owned the house until 1912, when Dr. Richard Deaver purchased it. Demolished in 1935., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., Also known as the Blair-Button-Deaver House.

Doorway of 6347 Main St. Keyser-Rodney House.
Exterior detail of front doorway of house built by John Keyser before the Revolution. Reverend John Rodney, rector of St. Luke's Episcopal Church in the middle of the 19th century, later occupied the house., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Doorway of Chew House, 1882.
Exterior detail of front doorway of Cliveden, flanked by shutters and two identical statues. Built 1763-1767 after designs by Jacob Knor for Benjamin Chew. Fortified by British troops commanded by Colonel Musgrave during the Battle of Germantown. Site of the turning point in the battle. Chew family residence until 1972 when acquired by National Trust for Historic Preservation., Slide number 93., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Doorway of Livezey House, 3 p.m.
Exterior detail of the first floor, entrance doorway and the second floor doorway that opens onto the balcony. Dwelling built for Thomas Shoemaker 1733-1739. Thomas Livezey bought the property, including a grist mill, from Shoemaker in 1747 and named it Glen Fern. In 1909 became the Valley Green Canoe Club., Slide number 129., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Doorway of Stenton.
Exterior detail of front doorway of Stenton. Built 1728-1734 by James Logan. The house remained in the Logan family until the early 20th century when the city acquired the property in 1910., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., Also known as the Logan House.

Doorway of Wister House, Vernon Park.
Exterior detail of doorway of dwelling constructed for James Matthews in two stages between ca. 1741 and 1805. The Wister Family purchased the property in 1812 and John Wister, president of Duncannon Iron Co., lived in the house until shortly before his death in 1900. Housed Germantown Branch of the Free Library 1898- 1907 and the Site and Relic Society (i.e. Germantown Historical Society) 1907-1927., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Doorway to Blair House, formerly in Bensel House.
Exterior detail of front door, formerly part of the Bensel House, which was demolished for the construction of the Germantown Saving Fund. Blair House, built circa 1750, was purchased by Dr. William Shippen as a summer residence in 1775. Dr. Samuel Blair, Shippen's son-in-law and president of Princeton University , also lived here., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., Also identified as the Shippen-Blair House and The Laurens.

Doorway to Johnson House, Main & Washington Ln.
Exterior detail of front doorway of house built 1765-1768 by master builder Jacob Knor and occupied by John Johnson during the Battle of Germantown. The house sustained injuries in the battle, including a hole in the parlor door caused by a cannon ball and a chipped corner of the house above the fence. Served as a station on the Underground Railroad. The Woman's Club of Germantown occupied the house after 1917., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Dr. Bensel's old barn, School Lane, rear of Saving Fund.
Exterior view of stone barn in the rear of the property at the southwest corner of Germantown Avenue and School House Lane. Dr. George Bensell erected a residence on the site of Jacob Tellner's dwelling in 1795. Although this residence was torn down in 1880, Bensell's barn survived in the rear of the property. Germantown Saving Fund occupied the building at the front of the property at the time of this photograph., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Dr. Dunton's house, 25 E. High St. A Pastorius house. Formerly stood on Main St.
Exterior view of southeast front and west side of house originally constructed by Daniel Francis Pastorius in 1696. The house was moved in 1851 to make way for the construction of High Street. Dr. William R. Dunton later occupied the house in the 1860s and the property was moved again, this time to 25 High Street for the construction of the First Methodist Episcopal Church of Germantown., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Dunkard Meeting House, Germantown. Main St. abv. Sharpnack, N.E. side, 1770, mother church of Dunkards or German Baptists.
Exterior view of west front of stone church, showing roundel window above the entrance door, flanked by a shallow portico. Known as the Church of the Brethren, founded by Alexander Mack in 1708 near Crefeldt in North Prussia. Persecution drove the congregation to Philadelphia in 1719 and in 1723 the first Dunkard or German Baptist Brethren Church was organized in Germantown. The congregation originally worshipped in a building erected by Christopher Sauer (4653 Main Street) and then in a house secured by Peter Pettikoffer, who begged for the money to erect the building. Called Beggar's Town or Bettel Hausen., Slide number 102., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

E. Park Drive where Wissahickon Drive enters.
Depicts a guard standing near a guard-house (left), next to Wissahickon Drive, a wide dirt road shaded by large trees. The stone arches of the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad bridge is visible in the background., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Edgar H. Butler's House, Main below High St. G'tn.
Exterior view of west front of the Butler Mansion, purchased by publisher Edgar H. Butler in 1856 and enlarged to include the portico and conservatory. The property was originally owned by Peter Rose, but the old homestead was torn down and the new one (depicted in the image) was constructed by Frederick Seckel ca. 1840. Demolished in 1914 for the construction of Germantown High School., Slide number 52., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Emlem Homestead. Washington's headquarters previous to Battle of Germantown, Whitemarsh, Pa.
Exterior view of dwelling of George Emlen built circa 1745 and occupied by George Washington during the Whitemarsh Encampment in 1777. View of house obstructed by trees and overgrowth surrounding the house., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Engle House, Germantown. Built 1758.
Exterior view of east front of house looking south. Built in 1758 by Benjamin Engle. The Engle family operated a tannery in the rear of the property along Honey Run. Demolished in 1955., Slide number 51., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Engle House, Main St. abv. Town Hall. Built 1758 by Benj. Engle. Stone in N. Gable B. E. 1758.
Exterior view of east front of house looking north. Built in 1758 by Benjamin Engle. The Engle family operated a tannery in the rear of the property along Honey Run. Demolished in 1955., Slide number 50., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Entrance to Jewish Hospital. Columns formerly in front of U. S. Mint, Juniper & Chestnut.
Depicts the front entrance columns preceding the entrance drive to the Jewish Hospital, facing Tabor Road. The columns were taken from the old United States Mint building at the northwest corner of Chestnut and Juniper Streets before it was demolished in 1902. The Chapel of the Jewish Hospital, built after designs by Magaziner & Potter circa 1912, can be seen in the background., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Fairmount Waterworks.
Depicts the Fairmount Water Works from the south. Built between 1812 and 1822 after the designs of Philadelphia engineer Frederick Graff. Frederick Graff, Jr., later altered and expanded the waterworks with the help of Philadelphia engineer, Henry P.M. Birkinbine., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

General Wayne Hotel, S.W. Main & Manheim Sts.
Exterior view of front facade of hotel built between 1780 and 1785. Building enlarged and gambrel roof installed in 1866. John B. Maxwell proprietor of hotel when this photograph was taken., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Germantown Academy, built 1760.
Exterior view of Germantown Academy, built in 1760 by Jacob Knor on land purchased from John and George Bringhurst. Known as the Union School House when it opened in 1761. Instruction was in both English and German. The building was used as a hospital after the Battle of Germantown in 1777 and again in 1798 during the Yellow Fever epidemic., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Germantown High School
Shows several students departing from Germantown High School built 1915 after the designs Henry Decourcey Richards at 5901 Germantown Avenue. The 3 1/2 story brick building contained 65 classrooms, an auditorium, gymnasium, infirmary, and library., Photographer's imprint stamped on mount., Title and date inscribed on mount., Slide number: 55., Decourcey, a school architect, was chief draftsman for the Board of Public education circa 1906-1919.

Girard College.
Exterior view of Founder's Hall, also identified as the main building, built 1833-1847 after designs by Thomas Ustick Walter. Endowed by philanthropist Stephen Girard to educate boys without fathers. Girard ran away from home in France at the age of fourteen, worked his way up to ship captain and landed in the states in 1776. He became one of the wealthiest men in America before his death seventeen years before the opening of Girard College in 1848., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Gowen House, S.E. cor. Main St. & Gowen Ave.
Exterior view of south flank and west front of dwelling built in 1792 by Joseph Miller. His daughter married James Gowen and the house descended through several generations of Gowens, including their son Franklin B. Gowen, Franklin E. Gowen and then his brother James E. Gowen. Later acquired by the Lutheran Theological Seminary., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

A Guernsey herd.
A Guernsey herd.
Depicts Guernsey cows in a field in the Berkshires., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Harmer House. East bank of Schuylkill below Grays Ferry. Torn down for the B & O R.R.
Exterior view of front facade of dwelling built circa 1764 for Samuel Rhoads and torn down to make way for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad tracks. Located near Reed Street between Thirty-fifth and Thirty-sixth Streets. Occupied by the Harmar family before it was demolished., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., Also known as Rhoads' Place and Harmar's Retreat.

Henry House, 1760. 4908 Main St. In 1828 bought by John S. Henry father of Alex Henry thrice mayor of Phila.
Exterior view of front facade and south side set behind a short stone wall. Built in 1760., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., Also known as the Wachsmuth-Henry House.

Hicksite Friends' Meeting House, N.E. 9th & Spruce. Since demolished.
Depicts a large, red brick meeting house sitting behind a red brick wall at the northeast corner of 9th and Spruce Streets. A "For Sale" sign is posted above the street signs on the brick wall. Two teenage girls in hats, shirtwaists and skirts walk along with a younger (or shorter) girl in similar dress. A man in a bowler, carrying a valise, has passed them., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Hokey Pokey Man.
Depicts a street vendor, with a wagon drawn by a donkey and protected by a striped awning, dispensing his wares to two young boys. Includes horse drawn carts in the background. The awning of The James Bell Co. is also visible in the background., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., Slide number 41.

Home of Anthony Gilbert, "the Strong Blacksmith."
Exterior view of front facade of dwelling occupied by Anthony Gilbert in 1809, a blacksmith who was known for his great physical strength. Original portion of house built circa 1745 as Wister's Tenant House, next to Wister's Big House., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., Identified as 5267 Main St. by some sources.

Home of Christopher Ludwig, Baker General to Continental Army. So. side Haines St. abv. Chew.
Depicts the north front of the stone dwelling of Christopher Ludwig sitting very close to the edge of the road. Ludwig was appointed Baker General to the American army in 1777 and received a certificate of good conduct from George Washington in 1785., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Home of Col. Thos. Forrest, artillery officer Battle Germantown. Stenton Ave, east side, north of Haines St.
Exterior view of front and flank of slightly rundown dwelling on Stenton Avenue north of Haines Street, once occupied by Col. Thomas Forrest. Laundry hangs from a line on the side porch. A man poses for the camera nearby., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Home of Thos. Godfrey, inventor of the quadrant. Died 1749. N. E. Church Lane & Dunton [sic] St. near Old York Road.
Distant view of the Spencer farm, the birthplace of Thomas Godfrey, inventor of the quadrant. The house, barn and other outbuildings sit on a hill overlooking Church Lane and Dutton Street., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Hotel on Ridge Ave. Falls of the Schuylkill.
Exterior view. Possibly the Falls Hotel along the 4100 block of Ridge Avenue., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Indian Rock Hotel, upper Wissahickon Drive.
Exterior view of the Indian Rock Hotel, named after the statue of Tedyuscung that stands on Indian Rock overlooking Wissahickon Creek. Located at Monastery Avenue and Wissahickon Drive, near Wissahickon Creek. Depicts the second hotel, built in the early 1870s following the purchase of the original building by the Fairmount Park Commission, procured by Charles Weingartner in 1894. The building was razed prior to 1916., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Jacob Knorr House, 1760, 6307 Main St.
Exterior view of west front and north flank of house built in 1760 by Jacob Knorr., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., Identified in some sources as the Dorsey House.

John Bringhurst House, 1775-1795, 5219 Main St.
Exterior view of front facade of dwelling owned by John Bringhurst from 1775 to 1795. Bringhurst was one of the founders of Germantown Academy and was one of the first to build "Germantown" wagons., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., Also known as Jungkurth House, after Christopher John Jungkurth who owned it during the Civil War.

John Keyser House, 6347 Main St. Revolutionary.
Exterior view of south flank and east front of house built by John Keyser before the Revolution. Reverand John Rodney, rector of St. Luke's Episcopal Church in the middle of the 19th century, later ocuppied the house., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount., Also known as the Keyser-Rodney House.

Johnson House, Main & Johnson Sts. Oldest house in Germantown. Built in 1698 by Heivert Papen. Passed into Johnson family early in the 18th century. Demolished in 1883
Exterior view of south flank and west front of first stone dwelling built in Germantown, at the northwest corner of Germantown Avenue and Johnson Street. Built in 1698 by Heivert Papen, a Mennonite who immigrated from Germany to Germantown in 1689. Datestone marked 1698 in upper portion of gambrel roof. Occupied by the Johnson family in the 18th century and demolished in 1883., Slide number 87., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

[[The]] Johnson House, Main & Washington Lane, built in 1768 by John Johnson. The doors & hall show marks of bullets in battle of Germantown.
Exterior view of north flank and east front of house built 1765-1768 by master builder Jacob Knor and occupied by John Johnson during the Battle of Germantown. The house sustained injuries in the battle, including a hole in the parlor door caused by a cannon ball and a chipped corner of the house above the fence. Served as a station on the Underground Railroad. The Woman's Club of Germantown occupied the house after 1917., Slide number 78., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Keyser House, 6316 Main St., subsequently owned by Elwood Johnson.
Exterior view of east front of house on land purchased by Dirck Keyser from Adam Simon Kuhn in 1756. Keyser operated a tannery in the rear of the property, which was willed to his son Peter Keyser in 1810. Cedar fence pierced by bullets during the Battle of Germantown. Occupied by Mr. Ellwood Johnson circa 1902. Portions of the tannery buildings in the rear of the property were demolished in 1952., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Knorr house, N.W. Main St. & Walnut Lane, from pencil sketch on a visiting card, made in 1862.
Copy of an oval shaped sketch from an 1862 visiting card depicting an exterior view of the residence of John George Knorr at the northwest corner of Germantown Avenue and Walnut Lane. Property owned by the family 1728-1849. House razed in 1868 for Jacob Albright to make way for a store., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

"Laurel Hill," Dr. Physic's residence. Fairmount Park. Built 1765.
Exterior view of front facade of the colonial mansion, Laurel Hill. The central portion of the house was built circa 1767, the single story addition circa 1800 and the octagonal wing after 1837. Built for Rebecca Rawle and her second husband, Samuel Shoemaker. The house was purchased by physician Philip Syng Physick in 1828 and it passed to Physick's daughter Sarah Randolph who in turn sold it to the Fairmount Park Commission in 1869. The Commission used it for employee housing from 1869-1901 and then leased it to two organizations, The Colonial Dames of America and later the Women for Greater Philadelphia, who opened it to the public., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Livezey House, Gtn. From west bank of Wissahickon.
Distant view of the house from the west bank of Wissahickon Creek. Built for Thomas Shoemaker from 1733-1739. Thomas Livezey bought the property, including a grist mill, from Shoemaker in 1747 and named it Glen Fern. The house was enlarged and raised one story in 1765, and sometime before 1853 a rear ell was constructed., Slide number 127., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount., Also known as Glen Fern, the Thomas Shoemaker House and the Valley Green Canoe Club (1909).

Looking east at mouth of Wissahickon.
Depicts an unidentified railroad bridge at the mouth of the Wissahickon Creek, looking east. Five boats are docked in the foreground., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Looking up Market St. from Front.
Wagons, trolleys and pedestrians crowd the street and sidewalks in front of the shops along the north side of Market Street, west of Front Street. Names of businesses are painted on signboards along the block. Visible names include F. Frenzell, Vance & Co. and Coates Bros. Wool. A cigar shop occupies the southwest corner lot in the foreground., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Loudoun, built 1801 by Thos. Armat for his son.
Exterior view of front facade. Original portion (i.e. east end) of house constructed in 1801 for Philadelphia merchant Thomas Armat by builders Peter L. Berry and John Ardis. Armat had the house built for his only son, Thomas Wright Armat. The west end was built in 1810 and the Greek portico in 1830. Named after Loudoun County, Virginia where Armat first settled in America., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Main St. above Upsal, S.W. side.
Depicts businesses and dwellings looking north along the 6500 block of Germantown, above Weaver Street, showing (from south to north) the small building occupied by public notary, John B Crowson; the south flank and east front of two attached dwellings and a row of commercial buildings., Slide number 101., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Main St. abv. Upsal.
Exterior view of south flank and east front of home, showing a partial view of the rear dining room, added circa 1880. Includes two men standing in front of the house looking north along Germantown Avenue. A bicycle is propped against the front of the house near the entrance stairs. The main portion of the house was built in 1798 on land owned by Christopher Mason, but the earliest part is believed to be the kitchen, probably built circa 1765., Slide number 100., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Main St. abv. Washington Lane, S.W. side of Main St.
Exterior view of south flank and west front of adjoined shops at the southwest corner of Germantown Avenue and Pomona Street. A stone and wooden fence lines the street and a dilapitated brick and stone building sits at the rear of the property. John W. Mangan's carpentry shop occupies 6330 Germantown Avenue and Millard Jacobs' tin wares are displayed on the sidewalk in front of his shop at 6332 Germantown Avenue., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Main St. entrance to Chew House, Main & Johnson St.
Distant view of front facade of Cliveden from the entrance drive on Germantown Avenue. Dwelling built 1763-1767 after designs by Jacob Knor for Benjamin Chew., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Market Square showing two old houses. Monument to soldiers who fell in War of Rebellion. Erected 1883.
Depicts Germantown's Market Square. Includes the Civil War monument, erected in 1883 by the members of Ellis Post, No. 6, Grand Army of the Republic. Shows the granite figure of a soldier at "parade rest." Monument moved to Belmont Avenue and George's Hill Drive in West Fairmount Park in 1909.The front of the Market Square Presbyterian Church is visible in the background, along with the Fromberger House, located south of the church at 5501-5505 Germantown Avenue., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Mehl House, 4817 Main St.
Exterior view of front facade and south flank of home standing on land owned by the Mehl family from 1763 to 1865. Includes a group of children passing in front of the house., Identified as 4821 Main Street in some sources., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Mennonite Meeting, Main St.
Exterior view of front facade of Mennonite church built in 1770 to replace the original log church constructed in 1708 on Germantown Avenue above Herman Street by early Germantown settlers. Considered the first Mennonite Church in America, founded in 1688., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

[Merchants Exchange, Philadelphia]
Exterior view looking northeast toward the Third Street front of the Merchant's Exchange, built between 1832 and 1833 after designs by William Strickland for the Philadelphia Exchange Company. Includes partial views of adjacent buildings, men crossing Third Street and a trolley travelling south., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Manuscript note on mount reads: Corn Exchange, 1898, Second St. Philada.

Mermaid Tavern, Main St., Chestnut Hill.
Exterior view of west front of hotel, purportedly constructed in 1734. Several men and women stand or sit on the porch and are looking curiously toward the camera. Two large trees and a trough are visible in the foreground. Demolished in 1913 to make way for Winston Road., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

[[The]] Monestary [sic]. Built by Joseph Gorgas bt. 1746 & 1752.
Exterior view of house built near Wissahickon Creek between 1746 and 1752 for Joseph Gorgas, a lumber merchant and third generation resident of Germantown. Constructed on the site of "the Kloster," the log cabin built in 1737 as a community house for the German Dunkards. Two carriages are parked on the wrap-around porch., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount., Also known as the Joseph Gorgas House and the Children's Museum of Philadelphia (1973).

Morris House.
Exterior view of east front of the Deshler-Morris House, built in 1772 for Quaker merchant David Deshler. Colonel Isaac Franks' owned the house when George Washington sought refuge here from the Yellow Fever epidemic that swept through Philadelphia in 1793. Nicknamed the "Germantown White House" during his occupation. The Morris family occupied the house for more than 100 years until they donated it to the National Park Service in 1948., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Morris-Littel House, Main & High St.
Exterior view of south flank and west front of house owned by the Morris-Littell family from 1776 until 1888. Dr. Christopher Wit (1675-1765) planted one of the first botanical gardens in North America on this site. The house was torn down for the construction of Germantown High School in 1915. Includes a view of the First Methodist Episcopal Church of Germantown at the northeast corner of Germantown Avenue and High Street., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Morris-Littel House, S. east cor. Main & High St.
Exterior view of north flank and west front of house owned by the Morris-Littell family from 1776 until 1888. Dr. Christopher Wit (1675-1765) planted one of the first botanical gardens in North America on this site. The house was torn down for the construction of Germantown High School in 1915. A little girl on roller skates holds the hand of a toddler as they cross Germantown Avenue walking toward the camera., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

N. E. Main & Walnut Lane, built 1806 by Rev. Saml. Blair for his son S. Blair Jr.
Exterior view of west front and south side of dwelling built by the Reverend Samuel Blair for his son Samuel Blair, Jr. in 1806. John Button, manufacturer of hosiery and owner of the Germantown Hosiery Mills, owned the property from 1835 until his death in 1882. His grandson Priestly owned the house until 1912, when Dr. Richard Deaver purchased it. Demolished in 1935., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., Also identified as the Blair-Button-Deaver House.

N. W. Upsal & Main St. from Upsal St.
Depicts the south flank of the ivy-covered Bardsley House from Upsal Street, obscured by trees in the rear yard. Built circa 1770 and occupied in the 1870s by English painter, John Bardsley, who brought the English sparrow to Germantown to fight the caterpillars that were infesting local trees., Slide number 97., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., Also known as the Sparrow Jack House.

N.E. [sic] & S.E. cor. Main St. and Chelten Ave.
Depicts Smyser & Scott's drug store at the southwest corner of Germantown and Chelten Avenues in the foreground. Includes the Germantown Trust Company across the street on the southeast corner, built in 1895 after designs by Hazlehurst & Huckel. The sidewalk is crowded with pedestrians, some who appear to be waiting for the trolley car that runs along Chelten Avenue., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Near Sheffield, Mass. 1890.
Near Sheffield, Mass. 1890.
Depicts a man wearing a vest and felt hat driving a pair of oxen to plow his field. He carries a large switch in his right hand to encourage the animals, and at his left hand is a little girl in a checked dress and broad-brimmed hat. The field has been fenced and is surrounded by trees, shrubs and a small lake., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Near Wakefield, Fisher's Lane.
Exterior view of a row of four, two-story dwellings behind a picket fence along Fisher's Lane, immediately west of Wingohocking Creek. Most likely the dwellings of workers employed by Wakefield Mills., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Neglee House, 4518-20 Main St., built before 1750.
Exterior view of front facade. Residence built circa 1727. John Naglee owned the house from 1727 to 1752., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

N.W. & N. E. Chelten Ave. & Main St., Post Office & 1st Presbyt. Church.
Depicts businesses at the northwest and northeast corners of Germantown and Chelten Avenues, including (from east to west) Edward M. Bennis' real estate office; the post office; the Germantown Business College in the Vernon Building; Schaefer conveyancer office and the Pennsylvania Railroad ticket office. The steeple of the First Presbyterian Church of Germantown is visible in the background. A horse and carriage sits at the corner and the sidewalks are crowded with pedestrians., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Old barn of Wyck altered into dwelling, Walnut Lane W. of Main St.
Exterior view of west and north facades of dwelling, once the Wyck barn, built in 1796 by J. Frederick Thomas. Architect Mantle Fielding converted the old barn into a residence circa 1891., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., Later known as the Franklin Courtney Residence.

Old building, Fisher's Hollow, used as a powder mill during Revolution.
Exterior view of a whitewashed stone dwelling used during the Revolution for storage of gunpowder. Near the Wakefield Mills., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Old Concord School House. Main St. Germantown, Pa. Built 1775
Shows the one-room school house completed in 1775 near the Upper Burying Ground at 6309 Germantown Avenue. View includes a gated brick fence and headstones. The school, built from subscription funds to educate the citizens of the upper end of Germantown, was altered to include a second floor in 1818 to accommodate town meetings., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title from manuscript note on mount., Slide number: 84., Inscribed on mount: Ortol [type of developer].

Old House, Main St. & Mermaid Lane.
Depicts a boy sitting on a fire hydrant near the log home proportedly built in 1743 for Christopher Yeakel, a cooper, at the northeast corner of Mermaid Lane and Germantown Avenue. Property surrounded by a wooden fence. Demolished circa 1905., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., The street names on the sign post in the image are backward, which means that the orientation of the slide is incorrect.

Old House. Ridge Ave. above Falls of Schuylkill on property of Powers & Weightman.
Depicts a run down house behind a white picket fence atop a stone wall. Other dwellings are visible in the background. Located along Ridge Avenue on the property of Powers & Weightman, near the chemical plant that spanned several blocks immediately south of Wissahickon Drive., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Old houses, N. side of Locust near 5th St.
Depicts a row of old dwellings and businesses along the north side of Locust Street, near Fifth Street, including a grocer (left) and L. Bernhardt, tailor, at 241. Includes the back of a delivery wagon, a partial view of a carriage (right) and a single pedestrian passing a row of barrels on the sidewalk., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Old Johnson House, N. W. Main & Washington Lane.
Exterior view of south flank and east front of house built 1765-1768 by master builder Jacob Knor and occupied by John Johnson during the Battle of Germantown. The house sustained injuries in the battle, including a hole in the parlor door caused by a cannon ball and a chipped corner of the house above the fence. Served as a station on the Underground Railroad. The Woman's Club of Germantown occupied the house after 1917., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Old Market, 2nd & Pine Sts. 1745. Clock & bell put in, 1819.
Depicts the north front and west flank of the fire-engine house (i.e., headhouse) at 2nd and Pine Streets, designed in 1745, with a cupola and alarm bell added in 1819. Two blocks of market sheds extend along 2nd Street from the rear of the headhouse to South Street., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Old market sheds, 1898. 2nd St. North from Lombard.
Depicts the market sheds looking north toward Headhouse Square, identified by the fire-engine house (i.e., headhouse), designed in 1745, with a cupola and alarm bell added in 1819. Two men stand under the roof and a third man rests himself by sitting in the flatbed of a service cart. Perhaps it is day's end. There is refuse in the streets but no sign of customers., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Old Mill near Jay Cooke's residence Chelten Hills.
Depicts two older men wearing suits and hats standing outside an old mill near Jay Cooke's Residence in Chelten Hills. A pile of lumber and overgrown weeds surround the mill., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Old P & R. Ry. Station, Main St., Germantown.
Exterior view of the Germantown Depot of the Philadelphia, Germantown, and Norristown Railroad at the southeast corner of Germantown Avenue and Price Street, across from Vernon Park. Built in 1855, replacing Shingle's Tavern, which was used as the waiting room and ticket office for the railway. Destroyed by fire in 1981., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., Slide number 40.

Old P.R.R. Station. foot of Market St., Phila. Just previous to widening Delaware Ave. 1898.
Depicts the front facade of the Market Street Ferry terminal at the foot of Market Street at Delaware Avenue. Carriages, trolleys, and pedestrians crowd the street and sidewalks. The Market Street Ferry was established about 1800 and was a principal form of transportation from Philadelphia to Camden, New Jersey through the early 20th century., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Old stone monument to Continental soldiers buried inside gateway to Chas. Wharton's place, Old York Road below Chelten Ave.
Depicts a rough stone, approximately eight to ten feet tall, near the gateway to Charles Wharton's estate, marking the graves of four Continental soldiers who were shot by the British as they met around a camp fire., Slide number 116., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Old tavern on Wissahickon Drive below Lincoln Drive.
View depicting the original Indian Rock Hotel, opened in 1848 by Reuben Sands north of Rex Avenue Bridge near Indian Rock in the Wissahickon Valley. The hotel was sold to the Fairmount Park Commission in 1872 and Sands opened a second Indian Rock Hotel at a nearby location. Building later used as police headquarters., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount., Also identified as Wissahickon Hall and the Fairmount Park Guard House.

Old willow, Vernon Park & a monument to commemorate Battle of Germantown.
Depicts an old willow tree in Vernon Park, on the west side of Germantown Avenue north of Chelten Avenue. Includes the monument commemorating the Battle of Germantown in the background and a sign for the Museum of the Site and Relic Society of Germantown (i.e. Germantown Historical Society)., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

On the Wissahickon, just above Kitchen's Lane, where the Dunkards baptized in 1719.
Depicts the section of the Wissahickon Creek where the Dunkards baptized their converts, not far from their community house, "the Kloster," later the site of the Monastery, the dwelling built by Joseph Gorgas from 1746 to 1752 near Kitchen's Lane., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

On the Wissahickon near Valley Green.
Depicts a duck wading in the water of Wissahickon Creek underneath the leafy branches of a tree., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Ottinger House. Built 1781. 4825 Main St. Christopher Ottinger was a soldier in the Penna. line.
Exterior view of front facade. Built circa 1781 by Christopher Ottinger, a Revolutionary soldier who became a master coach maker after the war., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Parsonage of St. Stephens Church, 5213 Main St.
Exterior view of front facade of St. Stephen's rectory, built at the end of the 18th century as a dwelling for Henry Fraley, carpenter and drum maker. Acquired by St. Stephen's as a rectory in 1856. Two women pass the rectory, walking in opposite directions., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Paul House, 6843 Main St. Occupied by Gorgas family during battle of Germantown.
Exterior view of west front of house purchased by Henry Paul, sadler, in 1813. Owned by the Paul family until 1915., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Pencoyd Iron Works, opposite mouth of Wissahickon.
Depicts the smokestacks and factory buildings of the Pencoyd Iron Works from the Schuylkill River. Includes boats on the river in the foreground. In 1852, Percival and Algernon Roberts started the business manufacturing bridge and structural steel supplies. Merged with the American Bridge Company in 1900., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Peter Robeson House in 1789. Ridge Road & mouth of the Wissahickon.
Copy of a sketch depicting the dwelling above Schuylkill Falls along Ridge Avenue as it looked in 1789. Several carriages and horses pass by on the road in front of the house., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount., Andrew Robeson purchased Shoomac Park in 1690 and operated a flour mill on the land. Andrew Robeson, Jr., the nephew of the original owner, purchased the property in 1702, managed operations until circa 1750 and sold the land. Shoomac Park did not return to the Robeson family until December of 1789, when Peter and Jonathan Robeson bought the park and mill from the Vandereen estate. Peter and his family lived here until his death in 1838. The Fairmount Park Commission purchased Shoomac Park in 1872.

Public library, Vernon Park.
Exterior view of front facade of library built in 1906 after designs by Frank Miles Day & Brother. A man stands on the entrance stairs with his back facing the camera., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount., The Germantown branch of the Free Library of Philadelphia was housed in Vernon or the old Wister Mansion (also known as the James Matthews residence) from 1892 until 1906 when Andrew Carnegie's donation enabled the city to construct a new library on the property.

Reading R.R. Bridge at mouth of Wissahickon.
Depicts the stone arches of the railroad bridge near the junction of Wissahickon Creek and the Schuylkill River above Ridge Avenue. Includes vehicle traffic traveling underneath the bridge. Marks the entrance to Wissahickon Creek, Wissahickon Drive and Wissahickon Park., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Rear of 5140 Main St. Gtn. House in which Gilbert Stuart painted portrait of Washington.
Depicts Gilbert Stuart's studio located in the rear of the property at 5140 Germantown Avenue. A man stands in the entrance, looking inside. The studio was partially destroyed by fire in 1854 and was demolished in 1900., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Rear of Johnson House, Main St. & Washington Lane.
Exterior view of north flank of house taken from the rear of the property looking toward Germantown Avenue. Rear of house obscured by trees. Built 1765-1768 by master builder Jacob Knor and occupied by John Johnson during the Battle of Germantown. The house sustained injuries in the battle, including a hole in the parlor door caused by a cannon ball and a chipped corner of the house above the fence. Served as a station on the Underground Railroad. The Woman's Club of Germantown occupied the house after 1917., Slide number 76., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Rear of old Swan Tavern, Ridge Ave & Nicetown Lane.
Exterior view of the side and rear ell of the Old Swan Tavern, showing two dog houses, a man holding a rake and an old shed attached to the ell. The tavern sign is barely visible near the road in front of the house., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Ripplemead from the hill.
Ripplemead from the hill.
Depicts a body of water, probably the New River running through Ripplemead, Va., over which a primitive ferry has just transported a horse and wagon and its driver. To the right is a small hut with a low aperture, not a door for human beings. Perhaps it is for storage. Two young boys stand by the hut. The road leading to the ferry landing is of dirt, very rough, and full of stones., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount., Slide number 73., American Lantern Slide Interchange typed on sticker on mount.

Riverside Mansion, formerly Milverton.
Exterior view of unusually broad, two-story mansion. Occupied by a beer garden operated by John F. Betz some time after 1880., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Riverside Mansion, Ridge Road, Phil.
Exterior view of unusually broad, two-story mansion from dirt drive, showing the words "Riverside Mansion" painted on the side addition. Occupied by a beer garden operated by John F. Betz some time after 1880., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Robeson's Knoll, mouth of Wissahickon.
Depicts a large rock formation near the old Robeson estate at the mouth of the Wissahickon Creek near Ridge Avenue., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

"Ship" House, Main St., G'tn. 6338 Main St. Built 1760. At one time an inn. First public hall in Gt'n. was in rear. One of first three hand fire engines kept here.
Exterior view of north flank of house known for the plaster-of-Paris model of a ship on the lower gable of the house. Includes three women standing in front of the house, with two baby carriages. Original portion of house built circa 1760. In the rear of the property was the first public hall in Germantown. The Germantown Fire Company housed a small engine known as the "Bull Dog" on the property. Kept as a hotel until 1836, when James Ford purchased the property and opened a boarding school for girls. Demolished circa 1906., Slide number 85., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount., Also known as Bockius House, for the family that resided here circa 1902.

Smith House. Main St. abv. High. DPS 1748 on gabel.
Exterior view of west front and south flank of tavern built in 1748 by Daniel and Sarah Pastorius adjacent to the homestead of his grandfather Francis Daniel Pastorius. Also known as the Saddler's Arms, The Hornet's Nest, and Mackinett's Tavern. David Mackinett was Sarah's second husband after the death of Daniel Pastorius. The building was moved north in 1930 for the expansion of the First Methodist Episcopal Church of Germantown and used as church offices., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Spring on the Cresheim Creek.
Depicts a narrow stream flowing over numerous small rocks at the foot of a wooded slope and pasture bounded by a fence. Grasses grow on both sides of the water., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

"Springbank," Wissahickon Ave. Built by Wm. Rittenhouse 1736, afterwards home of John Welsh.
Distant view of front facade of dwelling constructed by William Rittenhouse in 1736. Later occupied by John Welsh until his death in 1886. Welsh donated land to Fairmount Park, including Molly Runker's Rock, near which he erected the statue of William Penn., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

St. George's Hall. N.W. [sic] 13th & Arch Sts.
Exterior view of the north front and east flank of St. George's Hall built in 1835 by Thomas Walter Ustick as a residence for railroad executive Matthew Newkirk. Converted to the headquarters of the Society of the Sons of St. George in 1876, whose mission was to assist Englishmen in distress in America. The statue of St. George slaying the dragon on top of the front portico is partially visible. Includes numerous pedestrians crossing the street, the rear of a delivery wagon in the foreground and in the background, the tower of City Hall. Demolished circa 1903, after the society moved to 19th and Arch Streets., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., Also known as St. George's Society Club House.

Statue of Stephen Girard in Girard College.
Interior view of marble, life-size statue of Stephen Girard standing atop a sarcophagus in Founder's Hall. Francois Victor Gevelot designed the sarcophagus that holds the remains of Girard. A man in a bowler hat and suit leans on the wrought iron railing separating the public from the monument., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., Founder's Hall, also identified as the main building, built 1833-1847 after designs by Thomas Ustick Walter. Endowed by philanthropist Stephen Girard to educate boys without fathers. Girard ran away from home in France at the age of fourteen, worked his way up to ship captain and landed in the states in 1776. He became one of the wealthiest men in America before his death seventeen years before the opening of Girard College in 1848.

Steamboat plying between Phila. and Smith's Island. Between Phila. & Camden.
Depicts C. McAllister's side-wheeler steamboat from Smith Island in the Delaware River, between Philadelphia and Camden. Signboards on businesses lining the Philadelphia waterfront are visible in the background, along with the steeple of Christ Church on North Second Street., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Stenton, built by James Logan 1727.
Exterior view of front facade of Stenton. Built 1728-1734 by James Logan. The house remained in the Logan family until the early 20th century when the city acquired the property in 1910., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., Also known as the Logan House.

S.W. Manheim & Portico St., near Main St. Owned by Jacques Marie Roset in 1792. Introduced the tomato to Gtn.
Exterior view of front facade and flank of the Roset House at the corner of West Manheim Street and Portico Street (i.e. Spring Alley), with a group of four boys and two girls standing on the corner in front of the property. Includes a view of the front facade of the house west of the Roset House. Originally the home of Jacques Marie Roset who came to America in 1792 and moved to Germantown in 1821. One of his granddaughters married Anthony J. Drexel., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Thos. Kunders House, where 1st Friends' Meeting in Germantown was held.
Exterior view of front facade of house, showing a boy standing in the front doorway. Constructed on the site of Thones Kunders' original house, built in 1683. The first meetings of the Society of Friends were held in this house, along with the first public protests against slavery written here by Daniel Pastorius in 1688. Occupied by J.S. Harding & Son's antique furniture store at the time of this photograph., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Thos. Livezey House on Wissahickon.
Exterior view of the front facade of dwelling built for Thomas Shoemaker from 1733-1739. Thomas Livezey bought the property, including a grist mill, from Shoemaker in 1747 and named it Glen Fern. The house was enlarged and raised one story in 1765, and sometime before 1853 a rear ell was constructed., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., Also known as Glen Fern, the Thomas Shoemaker House and the Valley Green Canoe Club (1909).

Toland House, 4810 Main St., built abt. 1740. Home of Geo. Miller, an officer of Continental army.
Exterior view of front facade and south side of home built in 1734. Named for resident George W. Toland, a member of Congress from 1837 to 1843. A woman wearing a bonnet passes by the house., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Triumphal Arch. Peace Jubilee. Oct. 1898.
Depicts the Triumphal Arch (i.e. Athenean Arch) and Court of Honor along South Broad Street, showing a large group of pedestrians walking north toward City Hall. Erected after designs by Joseph M. Huston for the Peace Jubilee, a celebration of the end of the Spanish American War in 1898. Included a military parade that passed through the Court of Honor, along with other fesitivities that lasted several days in October., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

[Upsala, Johnson House. Main St. near Upsal St.]
Oblique view of front elevation of Upsala built 1798 by John Johnson III. The house was occupied by members of the Johnson family until 1941., Title supplied by cataloger., Slide number 95., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount. Title misidentifies the residence as Johnson House, 1798, Main St. abv. Johnson St.

Upsala, Johnson House. Main St. near Upsal St.
Distant view of south side and front elevation of house. Built 1798 by John Johnson III, the house was occupied by members of the Johnson family until 1941., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Valley Green Bridge, Wissahickon, 1913.
Depicts the stone bridge spanning Wissahickon Creek leading to Springfield Avenue. Built in 1832 and rebuilt in 1915. Also referred to as the Springfield Avenue Bridge., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Valley Green on Wissahickon.
View showing the inn built by Thomas Livezey circa 1850 near the Wissahickon Creek. The inn, managed by several proprietors under the Livezey family, was purchased by the city in 1872 and given over to the supervision of a patriotic women's society circa 1900. Shows signage adorning the building advertising a tea room and a telephone pay station. Lettering spelling "Valley Green" is visible on the side of the inn. Also shows a stone fence and a stable adjacent to the building., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Vernon Park near Main St.
Depicts two people, a woman and an elderly man walking with a cane, passing through Vernon Park on a pleasant day., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., Vernon Park was formerly the private estate of the Wister Family and was purchased by the City of Philadelphia in 1892.

Vernon Park on Greene St.
Depicts open field bordered by trees and posts near Greene Street in Vernon Park. Includes a carriage traveling along Greene Street in the distance., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount., Vernon Park was formerly the private estate of the Wister Family and was purchased by the City of Philadelphia in 1892.

Vernon, Wister mansion. Built in 1803 by James Matthews.
Exterior view of dwelling constructed for James Matthews in two stages between ca. 1741 and 1805. The Wister Family purchased the property in 1812 and John Wister, president of Duncannon Iron Co., lived in the house until shortly before his death in 1900. Housed Germantown Branch of the Free Library 1898- 1907 and the Site and Relic Society (Germantown Historical Society) 1907-1927., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Very old house, date unknown. Was used as home of sexton of St. Michaels Lutheran Church. 6669 Main St.
Exterior view of west front of the Beggarstown one-room school house on the property of St. Michael's Lutheran Church. Built circa 1740 and restored in 1915. Also identified as the dwelling of a sexton of St. Michael's at one time., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Wagner House, 4840 Main St., built 1747, hospital in Battle of Germantown.
Exterior view of front facade and south side. Built in 1747 by John Zachary at the southwest corner of Germantown Avenue and West Logan Street. Zachary sold the property to Samuel Mechlin and the property descended to George Mechlin Wagner. Demolished in 1915., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., Also known as the Mechlin-Wagner House.

Wakefield, home of Thos. & Sarah Fisher. Built about 1795.
Exterior view of southeast front of dwelling built circa 1795 for Thomas and Sarah Fisher. Thomas Fisher founded the Westtown School and managed Pennsylvania Hospital., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Wakefield, home of Thos. & Sarah Fisher. Built about 1795.
Exterior view of southeast front of dwelling built circa 1795 for Thomas and Sarah Fisher. Thomas Fisher founded the Westtown School and managed Pennsylvania Hospital. His son, William Logan Fisher established the Wakefield Mills not far from the house., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Wakefield Mills, Fisher's Lane. Built by Wm. Logan Fisher.
Depicts four children playing along a road flanked by factory buildings and small parcels of land subdivided by shoddy wooden fences. Discarded lumber, carts and other random objects are piled in the foreground. The mills were established by William Logan Fisher., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Wanamakers, 5 mo. 1899. Market St. Front.
Exterior view looking southeast at the Market Street front of John Wanamaker's dry goods store, the Grand Depot, opened in former Pennsylvania Railroad sheds in 1876. Also depicts a busy street scene showing pedestrians walking on the sidewalk and in the street near several trolley cars travelling west., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Warner houses, 6021 & 6023 Main St.
Exterior view of west fronts of dwellings constructed and occupied by the Warner (or Warmer) family since Christian Warmer the elder purchased tracts of land above and below the Pastorius homestead. Christian Warmer the younger resided here with Dr. Christopher Witt. Demolished in 1930 when the old Green Tree Tavern was moved north. Includes male pedestrians and a partial view of the property to the north., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Washington Inn, Washtn. Lane & Main St., known as Washington Tavern, 1793.
Exterior view of west front and south flank of tavern known as Washington Tavern since 1793. Also used as a market house in the 19th century. Includes a partial view of the entrance and storefront of the store located south of the tavern on Germantown Avenue., Slide number 74., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Where Wissahickon Drive joins E. Park Drive.
A large unidentified building sits amidst many tall trees in early leaf., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Window in Bartram House.
Exterior detail of first floor window in the Bartram House. Includes an inscription on the stone window sill above the window depicted: "It is God alone Almyty Lord, The Holy One by me ador'd. John Bartram. 1770.", Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount., Dwelling built 1730-1731 and altered in 1770 by botanist John Bartram.

Wyck.
Exterior detail of entrance near French doors of house. Earliest section of the house built circa 1690 by Hans Milan. Center section and alterations were designed and completed by William Strickland in 1824. For nine generations belonged to the Wistar-Haines family., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Wyck, front bedroom.
Interior view of bedroom, showing a four poster bed, two clothes chests and chairs lining the wall. Earliest section of the house built circa 1690 by Hans Milan. Center section and alterations were designed and completed by William Strickland in 1824. For nine generations belonged to the Wistar-Haines family., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

Wyck, front door.
Exterior detail of front doorway flanked by ivy. Earliest section of the house built circa 1690 by Hans Milan. Center section and alterations were designed and completed by William Strickland in 1824. For nine generations belonged to the Wistar-Haines family., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.

"Wyck" Haines home, Walnut Lane & Main St., oldest house standing in Gt'n at this date.
Exterior view of southeast front of house. Earliest section of the house built circa 1690 by Hans Milan. Center section and alterations were designed and completed by William Strickland in 1824. For nine generations belonged to the Wistar-Haines family., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title and date given in manuscript on mount.

Wyck in March 1840, from daguerreotype made by Prof. Walter R. Johnson.
Copy of daguerreotype depicting the exterior view of the house as it looked in 1840. Earliest section of the house built circa 1690 by Hans Milan. Center section and alterations were designed and completed by William Strickland in 1824. For nine generations belonged to the Wistar-Haines family., Photographer's imprint printed on mount., Title given in manuscript on mount.