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Blundering little hussy
A short and stout country bumpkin smiles and carries a pitchfork. The sender rejects the recipient's romantic advances because of his occupation., Text: Blundering little hussy, who can never move about, / But furniture and tea trays are all put to the rout ; / It's all your foolish vanity because you wil be seen, / When about your work, dressed in a crinoline : / Pray leave off your hoops and gain a little sense, / And then to gain a husband you may make some pretence., "No. 186", Provenance: Helfand, William H..

The Conceited Woman
A woman wears an elaborate crinoline, shawl and wide-brimmed hat. The hat partially conceals a sheep's head. The valentine suggests a person who does not dress age-appropriately is deceitful. Hecate is a Greek goddess assocaited with magic and crossroads, and is often represented as a hag or a crone., Text: There we see an old ewe, yet more like a ram, / Though a fifty-year old, she’s dressed like a lamb, / Both toothless and ugly, and snafty and base, / Yet she tries to look sheepish, and soft in the face. / Dress on, Mother Hecate, your stiff crinoline, / Floats flauntingly free, abroad in the wind, / But the looks that you give, and the fashions you wear, / Bids all of good sense and of manners beware., Provenance: Helfand, William H..

A Holy Show.
A man wearing gloves, a top-hat, spats and a monocle is riding a horse. The bucking horse has caused him to drop his riding crop and his monocle has fallen out of his eye., Text: A holy show you are, indeed, / When mounted on your bony steed; / To see you ride in your queer style / Would almost make a dead man smile. / If you know how gawky you look, and green, / You would never again on a nag be seen., Provenance: Helfand, William H..

Hoop de Doo.
A woman wears a large crinoline. Two small boys in the background mock her by saying "Hoop de doo den doo" and "Who's your Cooper?" One also places a basket on her skirt., Text: A hundred years ago they say, / Hoops were the fashion of the day, / They now completely stop the way. / Hoop de doo den doo. / As they sail along as fine, /In the day’s most busy time, / The passers by will CRY-NO-LINE! / Hoop de doo den doo. / I’m sure it must be van-i-ty, / That makes you so extrav-a-gant-ly / Dress that all the boys will cry, / Hoop de doo den doo. / “Who’s your Cooper” now they ask, / You roll along just like a Cask, / And getting by you is a task, / (with your) Hoop de doo-den doo., Provenance: Helfand, William H..

I as soon would wed
A man wearing a coat decorated with braid carries a small animal. The valentine warns that his fancy attire will not attract a mate., Text: I as soon would wed a monkey, / As a saucy swaggering flunkey, / Who fancies that a gaudy coat, / Would make the ladies on him doat; / And thinks fine feathers fine birds make, / Though there he makes a great mistake, / For let his coat be e’er so fine, / No flunkey shall by my Valentine., Provenance: Helfand, William H..

If My Passion
A woman wearing a flowered bonnet holds a fold of her dress in her hand. Her shoes, undergarments and crinoline are visible below her dress., Text: If my passion I ever declare, / Your heart I should like to possess; / But alas! You’ve so little to spare, / All being devoted to dress., Provenance: Helfand, William H..

If My Passion
An elaborately dressed woman holds the folds of her skirt. Her shoes and crinoline are visible beneath the skirt., Text: If my passion I ever declare, / Your heart I should like to possess; / But alas! You’ve so little to spare, / All being devoted to dress., Cf. Valentines 15.13, 15.15, 15.16., Provenance: Helfand, William H..

If My Passion
A woman with an elaborate hairstyle carries a parasol. In the other hand, she holds her voluminous skirt. Her petticoat and the tassles on her boots are visible beneath her skirt., Text: If my passion I ever declare, / Your heart I should like to possess; / But alas! You’ve so little to spare, / All being devoted to dress., Cf. Valentines 15.13, 15.14, 15.16., Provenance: Helfand, William H..

If My Passion
A woman carrying a parasol walkes by an enclosed garden. She is holding the front of her skirt up to reveal lacy undergarment beneath it., Text: If my passion I ever declare, / Your heart I should like to possess; / But alas! You’ve so little to spare, / All being devoted to dress., Cf. Valentines 15.13, 15.14, 15.15., Provenance: Helfand, William H..

Just A Little Flattered
A man stands in front of a fence smoking a cigar. He wears a fez and a pocket watch. The valentine suggests he is overly impressed with his physical appearance., Text: Why, here’s your portrait ready done, / Now don’t suppose I’m making fun. / ‘Tis like as like you must admit; / I’m sure you’ll highly value it., Provenance: Helfand, William H..

Look Dandy, pray
A donkey wears a coat. The sender considers the recipient's attention to dress to be ridiculous., Text: Look Dandy, pray look, / Look at your Brother; / Why should not one Ass, / Look at another., Provenance: Helfand, William H..

A Loud Working-Girl
A woman wears a dress with a large bow, gloves and a hat and carries an umbrella. The valentine criticizes her for talking too loudly., Text: In girls of these progressive days / A little boldness we expect, / And, when within due bounds it’s kept, / Not many will object: / But, o’er all bounds you go so far / With your loud ways, and saucy face, / That every one’s disgusted with / Your lack of womanly grace., Provenance: Helfand, William H..

Man with Elk Horns
A man with elk horns looks at his reflection in an ornate mirror. Horns can be a sign of being a cuckold., Provenance: Helfand, William H..

Man with Pipe
A man in a patched coat holds a pipe and approaches a couple seated at a table., Provenance: Helfand, William H..

Of Dandizetts You're Sure
A woman wears a large crinoline, a cape, gloves and a hat with a snood. "Bean" can mean money., Text: Of Dandizetts you’re sure the Queen, The loveliest creature ever seen, / Your head so small and shape so fine, / Must make each bean your valentine., Provenance: Helfand, William H..

Oh! Daughter of Fair
A woman steps out of a door and reveals her petticoats under her crinoline. A sign behind her reads "To the Bank" and a man is standing next to the steps. The valentine suggests that the sight of her legs is embarassing to the people around her., Text: Oh! Daughter of fair mother Eve, / Your brothers all you sorely greive, / And give us each exceeding pain / To witness thus the curse of Cain. / ‘Tis surely not a modest sight / To have the legs thus brought to light., Provenance: Hlefand, William H..

Oh, Dear Me
A coachman wearing a hat and coat with epaulets stands by a carriage and holds a stick. "Monkey's share" can refer to the term monkey's money, meaning payment in kind., Text: Oh, dear me, you think yourself grand, / Standing et my lord’s door with stick in hand, / My lot with you I would not fix, / For the sight of you makes me feel sick, / Bowing here, scraping there / Sometimes you get the Monkey’s share., Cf. Valentine 15.42, Provenance: Helfand, William H..

Oh, Dear Me
A coachman wearing a hat and coat with epaulets stands by a carriage and holds a stick. "Monkey's share" can refer to the term monkey's money, meaning payment in kind., Text: Oh, dear me, you think yourself grand, / Standing at my lord’s door with stick in hand, / My lot with you I would not fix, / For the sight of you makes me feel sick, / Bowing here, scraping there / Sometimes you get the Monkey’s share., Provenance: Helfand, William H..

The Old Bachelor.
A man in ragged clothing walks with an umbrella tucked underneath his arm. A bust of a nude young woman on a pedestal is visible in the background., Text: Your buttonless shirt, and ragged coat sleeves, / Proclaim you to be an old Bach; / Pray hunt up some young maid, I really believe / If you tried, you would soon make a match., Cf. Comic Valentine 7.49, Provenance: Helfand, William H..

Shop Girl's Sunday
A woman in an elaborate outfit smiles and puts one hand on her hip. Her smile reveals gaps in her teeth. The valentien suggests she has an inlfated opinion of herself., Text: In cheap, dinky togs, which you think very fine, / You try every Sunday to cut a big shine; / Of style or of beauty you’ve nothing to speak, / But you make up your shortage with plenty of cheek. / Perhaps you imagine that people you meet / Don’t know what you are as you walk down the street; / If so, you’re in error to think them so green, / For you’re known for a Shop Girl as soon as you’re seen., Provenance: Helfand, William H..

A Sight to Make
A woman rides a bicycle. The Sun is visible in the background, wearing a wide smile. The valentine suggests the woman look ridiculous riding the bicycle., Text: The Sun in his daily journey / Must gaze on queer sights many, / But I’m sure that on your Cycle / Are quite as queer as any. / Absurd enough you were always / To take away folk’s breath, / But now there’s really danger / You’ll make them laugh to death., Provenance: Helfand, William H..

To be out of fashion
A man stands in a garden smoking a cigarette or cigar. He wears a top hat, glasses, and patterned trousers. He also has a moustache and muttonchops. The valentine chides him for focusing too much on dress and following fads., Text: To be out of fashion is to be out of the world, ‘tis said, / So you adopt the jacket, smoke, and are by fashion led, / In fashion, if you will waste your thread of life, / No Woman of sense, will ever become your Wife., Cf. Valenitne 16.42, Provenance: Helfand, William H..

To be out of fashion
A man walks and smokes a cigar. He carries an umbrella and wears a top hat. The valentine criticizes him for caring too much about following fashions., Text: To be out of fashion is to be out of the world, ‘tis said, / So you adopt the jacket, smoke, and are by fashion led, / In fashion, if you will waste your thread of life, / No Woman of sense, will ever become your Wife., Provenance: Helfand, William H..

Who foolishly regards himself.
A man with muttonchops looks in a mirror and sees a donkey., Text: Who foolishly regards himself / A handsome man, / Take yonder mirror off the shelf, / And admire your portrait if you can., Provenance: Helfand, William H..

With a fine hat
A woman wears a large hoop skirt, a cape, and a feathered hat, and carries a parasol and small bag. The sender suggests that such attention to appearances will not make up for the recipient's personal defects., Text: With a fine hat and painted face, / Leading a life of gay disgrace, / Don’t think that wearing such a hat, / Will aid you to catch a flat, / Your false hair is nicely braided, / Your infamy well paraded., Provenance: McAllister, John A. (John Allister), 1822-1896, collector.

You Don't Look
Two moustached men are shown with identical top hats, canes, and cigars. The man on the left is how he sees himself, the man on the right is how others see him. The text suggests that by drawing attention to himself with fine clothes, he seems even more ridiculous., Text: Upon the left we here portry / The way you think you look, you jay, / While there is shown upon the right / Your aspect in the public's sight. / You see the difference is not small / And if you'd any sense at all, / You would be careful not to wear / So pompous and absurd an air., Provenance: McAllister, John A. (John Allister), 1822-1896, collector.

You queer looking
A man with a monocle and a whip stands in front of a wall. He has antlers protruding from his head., Text: You queer looking fellow, you ill looking brute, / You never will me for a valentine suit, / And if for a husband I ever should take thee / This is the figure I'd certainly make ye., Provenance: Helfand, William H..

You’re a gentleman true
A man wearing a top hat, frock coat and gloves carries a cane. The valentine suggests that his attention to dress does not succeed in making him attractive., Text: You’re a gentleman true, but you never will do. / Such a long and lean foundry old poker as you; / By the impudent stare, I can vow and declare, / You look like a Smike, and VAGABOND TOO., Provenance: Helfand, William H..