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Life in Philadelphia. "What you tink of my new poke bonnet...?" [graphic] / Hunt, Sc.
Racist caricature depicting an African American woman trying on a bonnet in the company of her African American companion, "Frederick Augustus." Depicts the woman in profile, in front of a standing mirror tilted toward her, trying on a yellow Dunstable bonnet so large that the side of her face is obscured. Her hand rests on the side of the hat adorned with a pink ribbon. Her reflection is not visible in the mirror. She wears a pink calico dress with a white collar that covers her shoulders, white gloves, patterned stockings, and white slipper shoes. She asks "Frederick Augustus" what he thinks. He stands behind her with his arms crossed and looks toward the mirror. He holds a walking stick under his left upper arm. A dog with a muzzle sits behind him. He responds that he does not like the style. He wears a beard and is attired in a top hat, long blue overcoat with collar, striped pants, white gloves, and black slipper shoes. A white woman sales clerk, wearing a large top-knot hairstyle, watches the woman from behind a counter on which other Dunstable bonnet and a candlestick are displayed. Bonnets, hat boxes, and packages on shelving and pink and yellow bunting is visible above the clerk’s head. The figures are portrayed with oversized and exaggerated features., Title from item., Date inferred from content and name of publisher., Contains seven lines of dialogue in the vernacular and dialect below the image: What you tink of my new poke bonnet Frederick Augustus? I don’t like him no how, case dey hide you lubly face, so you can’t tell one she nigger from anoder., After the work of Edward W. Clay., Plate 14 of the original series published in Philadelphia., Charles Hunt was a respected London engraver who was most well known for his aquatints of sporting subjects., Copy published in Philadelphia described in Pennsylvania Inquirer, 17 June 1830, p. 2 and ‘Life in Philadelphia, No. 14. The Dunstable Bonnet’, Pennsylvania Inquirer, 17 June 1830, p. 3., RVCDC, Description revised 2021., Access points revised 2021.

Life in Philadephia [sic]. The valentine. [graphic] / Designd & drawn by W. Summers; Hunt sculpt.
Racist caricature depicting an African American man reading a comic valentine in his bedroom as he prepares for bed. Shows the bearded man, beside a bed with a pink canopy, holding the back of a tilted chair (his waistcoat on it) with his left hand and holding up the valentine illustrated with a picture of the devil in his right hand. The man is portrayed with an angry expression and standing with his feet far apart. He wears a night cap, a blue-striped shirt, a black neck tie, brown pantaloons from which a watch fob hangs, white stockings and one red slipper. A water pitcher and boots lie near his feet. In the left, an African American woman, smiles, and stands behind the ajar bedroom door. She wears a night bonnet, neckerchief, short-sleeved shirt, blue skirt, and black slippers. A stairwell is seen behind her. Figures are portrayed with oversized and exaggerated features and their skin tone is depicted in black hand coloring., Title from item,, Date inferred from content and name of publisher., Contains one bubble of dialogue in the vernacular within the image: Holl’a! What’s all dis about_. “De rose is Red de Violets blue” De Debils Black and so are You. Well dat’s bery Fair indeed., Inscribed: No. 6., Charles Hunt was a respected 19th-century London engraver and etcher known mostly for his prints of sporting subjects., RVCDC, Description revised 2022., Access points revised 2022.

The Philadelphia dandies. A group of fashionables. "Shoot folly as it flies." [graphic] / Kensett, sculp.
Caricature lampooning "fashionable" middle-class Philadelphians depicting two scenes of “belles” being greeted. The first scene portrays a white belle, in the right, being greeted by a white dandy, in the left, who holds up a monocle in his left hand and asks, "How do you do?" They are each bent over and face each other. The dandy is attired in a white ruffled shirt, blue waistcoat, tan pants, and grey boots with spurs. He holds down a black top hat from which a cane hangs in his right hand. The belle is attired in a large green bonnet that curves at the back of her head and that is adorned with feathers and a ribbon, a pink, long-sleeved, knee-length, belle-shaped dress, and boots. She holds a green umbrella up in her right hand toward the raised arm of the dandy and the back of her dress has risen up. A pug-like jumps up and barks at her from behind. She responds that she is “rather cold.” The second scene depicts a white belle being greeted by a "fashionable" white woman and girl whose hand she holds. The women and girl are all similarly attired in large bonnets adorned with flowers, long-sleeved, high waisted, calf-length dresses in pink or green, and boots or ankle-laced shoes. They are also portrayed with stooped postures and accentuated posteriors. The woman with the child also holds a pink purse in the same hand as that of the girl who also wears pantalettes and holds a green parasol in her left hand. A third woman wearing a mortarboard style hat adorned with feathers, a long-sleeved, calf-length, high-waisted dress with under skirt, and boots, holds a spear-shaped umbrella over her shoulder and "marches" passed them in the right. Also, shows a pug-like dog standing in the left by the women who greet each other., Title from item., Date inferred from content., Contains two bubbles of dialogue within image of first scene: How do you do? How do you do? Madam! How is it with you today? It is rather Cold, sir!-, This caricature is similar in content to the prints from the series, "Life in Philadelphia" (London Set), and has been catalogued as part of the series., RVCDC, Description revised 2022., Access points revised 2022.

Promenade in Washington Square. [graphic].
Caricature depicting a modishly dressed white couple (man and woman) strolling through Philadelphia's Washington Square near the Society Hill section of the city. The woman wears a bright yellow dress with extremely puffed leg o'mutton sleeves and a dramatically large yellow hat with a massively wide brim. Blue and yellow striped ribbons are attached to the hat and hang down from the brim. A kerchief and necklace adorn her neck. She carries a purple purse and a pink umbrella in her left hand and a pink monocle in her right. She holds the monocle close to the side of her chin. The man wears a blue waistcoat with massively puffed leg o'mutton sleeves, a plaid cravat, brown trousers, and top hat. He holds a walking cane in his left hand to the side of his waist. Both figures are depicted with corseted waists. Two fashionably dressed women, a fashionably dressed couple (man and woman) with a child, and multi-story buildings and trees are seen in the background. In the early 1800s Washington Square evolved from a pasture ground and a burial ground for the city’s African American community, indigent community, and Revolutionary War soldiers in the 18th century to a park at the request of the wealthy residents in the neighborhood., Title from item., Date inferred from dates of later plates in the series., Probably published by William Simpson., Inscribed: Plate 1., Nancy Reynolds Davison's E.W. Clay: American political caricaturist of the Jacksonian era. (PhD. diss., The University of Michigan, 1980), p. 86. (LCP Print Room Uz, A423.O)., Part of the digital collections catalog through a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services as administered by the Pennsylvania Department of Education through the Office of Commonwealth Libraries, and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Tom Corbett, Governor, 2013-2014., Description revised 2021., Access points revised 2021., Accessioned in 1999.

Sketches of character. Plate 2. At home. Plate 3. Abroad. [graphic] / Drawn on stone by E. W. Clay; C. G. Childs lithy.
Racist caricature contrasting two scenes of the same African American couple "At Home" and "Abroad." The "At Home" scene depicts the couple in their kitchen with a wood floor washing dishes together. In the right, the woman, attired in a kerchief, short sleeves, apron, skirt, and slip on shoes, is bent over and washes the dishes in a tub on a stool. In the left, the man, barefoot and attired in a shirt with the sleeves rolled up, vest, bow tie, and pants, sits on the edge of a butcherblock table on top of which a pile of dishes rests, and dries one. The man and woman look at each other. In the background, on the wall, cooking utensils, pots and pans, and a slab of bacon hang from hooks underneath a shelf lined with cook and dishware near a large woven basket, a cupboard, and a small shelf with two bottles. The "Abroad" scene depicts the pair well attired and about to promenade down a city street, possibly Philadelphia and from near Independence Hall. The woman wears a large plumed bonnet with a veil and a ribbon tied under her chin, a blue cape over a dress giving her the appearance of a bell, and gaiter-like shoes. Her husband wears spectacles, a top hat, white shirt, yellow vest, black waist coat, grey pants, and yellow gloves. He holds a walking cane down toward the ground in his left hand and his other arm out to his companion. A guardhouse is seen in the right and the edge of a building (possibly Independence Hall) in the left. Cityscape is visible in the distant background. Figures are portrayed with oversized and exaggerated features and their skin tone is depicted in brown hand coloring., Title and date from item., Copy right secured., Lib. Company. Annual Report, 2013, p. 51., Purchased with the Davida T. Deutsch African American History Fund., RVCDC, Description revised 2022., Access points revised 2022.

Tregears black jokes. The Lady Patroness of Alblacks. [graphic] / W. Summers, del.; Hunt, scul.
Racist caricature depicting a middle-class African American woman looking at herself in a full-length mirror in her well- decorated bedroom. Shows the woman, attired in a white, low décolleté underdress with puffed, cap sleeves, slightly lifting up the skirt of her dress in her left hand and her raised right hand holding a comb near her hair that is styled in a top knot. She looks at her reflection. She is portrayed with a wrinkled brow and bags under her eyes. Her reflection does not have these features. In the right, a bed with a canopy on which a wide-brimmed hat rests on a post; a table on which a pin pad, hair comb, pearl necklace, and earrings rest; and a black cat with its back raised are visible. In the left, on either side of the mirror, a pink dress rests on a clothing rack and white ankle-lace shoes lie on the carpeted floor. Scene also includes three framed picture on the wall in the background. Two are partially visible and the one fully visible shows a genre scene outside of a stone dwelling where an African American man is on his knee and holding the hand of an African American woman who stands in front of him. Figure is portrayed with oversized and exaggerated features and her skin tone is depicted in black hand coloring., Title from item., Date inferred from content and name of publisher., Inscribed: No. 2., This caricature is similar in content to the prints from the series, "Life in Philadelphia" (London Set), and has been catalogued as a part of the series., Charles Hunt was a respected 19th century London engraver and etcher known mostly for his prints of sporting subjects., RVCDC, Description revised 2022., Access points revised 2022.

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