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[Chestnut Street, above Fourth, south side] [graphic]
View of Chestnut Street, between 4th and 5th Streets, south side, looking west. Primarily depicts the Philadelphia Bank building (400-408 Chestnut, designed by Philadelphia architect William Strickland, built 1836) which served as an office building and displays signage for Aetna Life Insurance Company; Commonwealth Bank; Edward Borheck, optician; and Alfred J. Reach's cigar store. Includes a partial view of the U.S. custom house (formerly the Second Bank of the U.S., also designed by Strickland, built 1818-24) and the U.S. Post Office building (1863-1884). Right hand corner of the image contains a large sign advertising card and job printing probably for the firm of Glessner & Co.; and a sign advertising a patent medicine, Wright's tar syrup. Also contains two horse-drawn carriages and a street vendor's stall., Title from manuscript note on verso., Yellow mount with sqaure corners., Originally part of a McAllister scrapbook., Digitization funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-506-19-10), 2010-2012., Bartlett & French was a partnership between Philadelphia photographers George O. Bartlett and William French ca. 1867-1869.

Chestnut Street, above Third. [graphic] / Photographed by Bartlett & French, Phila.
View of Chestnut Street, between 3rd and 4th Streets, south side, looking east. Shows offices of newspaper publishers (the Public Ledger and the Inquirer) and printers (James B. Chandler's steam power printing and Thomas Magee's job printing and stationery); and signage for Watts & Butler silversmiths and Perry & Co. merchant tailors., Title, photographer's imprint and series number from accompanying printed label., Yellow mount with square corners., Originally part of a McAllister scrapbook., Digitization funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-506-19-10), 2010-2012., Bartlett & French was a partnership between Philadelphia photographers George O. Bartlett and William French ca. 1867-1869.

[Chestnut Street, above Third] [graphic]
View of Chestnut Street, between 3rd and 4th Streets, south side, looking east. Shows offices of newspaper publishers (the Public Ledger and the Inquirer) and printers (James B. Chandler's steam power printing and Thomas Magee's job printing and stationery); and signage for Watts & Butler silversmiths and Perry & Co. merchant tailors., Title from duplicate image (8)1322.F.19e., Unmounted half of stereoview., Originally part of a McAllister scrapbook., Digitization funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-506-19-10), 2010-2012., Bartlett & French was a partnership between Philadelphia photographers George O. Bartlett and William French ca. 1867-1869.

Custom House Philada. [graphic].
View looking west on Chestnut Street showing the United States Custom House at 420 Chestnut Street. Originally built as the Second Bank of the United States in 1824 after the designs of Philadelphia architect William Strickland, the building served as the U.S. Custom House from 1845 to 1935. Includes two vendor stands and several individuals sitting and standing on the steps of the customhouse., Title and date from manuscript note on mount., Yellow mount with square corners., Originally part of a McAllister scrapbook of views of Philadelphia., Retrospective conversion record: original entry, edited., Reproduced in The Print and Photograph Department of the Library Company of Philadelphia's Center City Philadelphia in the 19th century (Portsmouth, N.H.: Arcadia Publishing, 2006), p. 100., Arcadia caption text: This impressive marble-faced building, constructed between 1821 and 1824 as the Second Bank of the United States after designs by William Strickland, served as the United States Custom House from 1845 to 1935. The entire building from the space under the exterior stairs to the ceiling was constructed with arches “in a bomb-proof manner” intended to discourage attacks on the building by “incendiaries.” This 1867 view of the structure showing the Chestnut Street façade includes two street vendors selling produce., Digitization funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-506-19-10), 2010-2012.

Dr. Jayne's Building. [graphic]
View of Chestnut Street, between 2nd and 3rd, south side, looking east. Includes the Jayne Building (242-244 Chestnut), constructed 1848-1850, based on the designs of Philadelphia architect William J. Johnston for David Jayne, chemist and manufacturer of patent medicines. Six story wings on either side (238-40 and 246 Chestnut Street) were constructed in 1851 and designed by Thomas Ustick Walter. Image also shows the Western Union Telegraph Co. building and includes several horse-drawn carts and wagons., Title and series number from accompanying printed label with stereograph., Stereograph on yellow mount with square corners., Originally part of a McAllister scrapbook., Digitization funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-506-19-10), 2010-2012., Bartlett & French was a partnership between Philadelphia photographers George O. Bartlett and William French ca. 1867-1869.

Fairmount from the locks. [graphic].
View looking from above the Schuylkill Canal lock showing the Fairmount Water Works. Shows the old engine house; old mill house; new mill house (completed 1862); the standpipe, distribution arch, and pavilion on Reservoir Hill; and a man standing on the rocks forming the lock. The waterworks, originally built between 1812 and 1822 after the designs of Philadelphia engineer Frederick Graff, were altered and expanded after the designs of Philadelphia engineers Henry P. M. Birkinbine and Frederick Graff, Jr. until 1872., Title from accompanying label., Yellow paper mount with square corners., Originally part of a McAllister scrapbook of views of Philadelphia., Retrospective conversion record: original entry, edited., Digitization funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-506-19-10), 2010-2012.

Fairmount Water Works.
Fairmount Water Works.
View looking north past the old mill house showing the new mill house at the water works originally built between 1812 and 1822 after the designs of Philadelphia engineer Frederick Graff. The new mill house, built between 1859 and 1862 after the designs of Philadelphia engineer Henry P.M. Birkinbine, housed the engines that replaced the water wheels that previously powered the waterworks., Title and photographer's imprint printed on label pasted on verso., Yellow mount with square corners., Retrospective conversion record: original entry, edited.

[Fairmount Water Works.] [graphic].
View looking north past the old mill house showing the new mill house at the water works originally built between 1812 and 1822 after the designs of Philadelphia engineer Frederick Graff. The new mill house, built between 1859 and 1862 after the designs of Philadelphia engineer Henry P.M. Birkinbine, housed the engines that replaced the water wheels that previously powered the waterworks., Title and name of photographer from label on verso of duplicate P.9466.9., Originally part of a McAllister scrapbook of views of Philadelphia., Retrospective conversion record: original entry, edited., Digitization funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-506-19-10), 2010-2012.

Fred'k Graeff's monument at Fairmount. [graphic].
Shows the monument dedicated to Fairmount Water Works engineer Frederick Graff commissioned by the city and installed June 1, 1848 in the garden near the Fairmount Dam. Monument, adorned with Gothic trim, contains a bust of Graff sculpted by Hugh Cannon and is surrounded by an ironwork fence and benches. View also includes two spectators, including a man leaning on a bench; the statue of Diana near the inclined walkway to Reservoir Hill; partial views of a pavilion and the standpipe arch of the water works; and snow on the ground., Attributed to Bartlett & French., Title from label on verso of P.9212.17., Yellow mount with square corners., Distributor's label on verso of P.9212.17: From James Cremer's Stereoscopic Emporium, 18 South Eighth St. Philadelphia., One of images originally part of a McAllister scrapbook of views of Philadelphia., Digitization funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-506-19-10), 2010-2012., Bartlett & French was a partnership between Philadelphia photographers George O. Bartlett and William French circa 1867-1868.

Horticultural Hall, Broad Street, below Locust. [graphic].
View of the front elevation of Horticultural Hall, the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society's headquarters on South Broad Street. Broadside posters adorn the front of the building and can be seen along the fence separating the hall from the Academy of Music. Gas lamps flank the entrance stairs and large stones are piled in the street south of the building. Samuel Sloan designed the hall in 1867. A fire destroyed this hall in early 1881, and it was rebuilt in 1882 after designs by Addison Hutton., Titles from printed label on paper mount., Yellow paper mount with square corners., Cataloging funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-506-19-10), 2010-2012., Retrospective conversion record: original entry, edited., Bartlett & French was a partnership between Philadelphia photographers George O. Bartlett and William French circa 1867-1869.

La Pierre House, Academy of Natural Science, and Union League, Broad Street, below Chestnut. [graphic]
View showing the La Pierre House hotel, the second building of the Academy of Natural Sciences museum, and the Union League on the west side of the 100 block of South Broad Street. The hotel, completed in 1853 after the designs of Philadelphia architect John McArthur, was expanded and renamed Lafayette Hotel in 1876. The second building of the Academy, completed in 1840 after the designs of Philadelphia architect John Notman, and expanded in 1855, housed the museum until 1876. The Union League, established to raise money and recruits for the Union cause, was completed in 1865 after the designs of Philadelphia architect John Fraser. Includes a horse-drawn carriage parked in front of the museum., Title from accompanying label., Yellow mount with square corners., Originally part of a McAllister scrapbook of views of Philadelphia., Retrospective conversion record: original entry, edited., Digitization funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-506-19-10), 2010-2012.

[Laurel Hill Cemetery, 3822 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia] [graphic].
View showing an iron-work bench, headstones, and a sepulchral monument in the cemetery built 1836-1839 after the designs of John Notman. Also shows a section of the Falls Bridge over the Schuylkill River in the distant background., Title supplied by cataloguer., Yellow mount with square corners., Attributed to Bartlett & French., Originally part of a McAllister scrapbook of views of Philadelphia., Digitization funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-506-19-10), 2010-2012., Bartlett & French was a partnership between Philadelphia photographers George O. Bartlett and William French circa 1867-1868.

Ledger Building. [graphic] / Photographed by Bartlett & French, Phila.
View of the southwest corner of Sixth and Chestnut Streets showing the newly constructed offices of the Philadelphia newspaper the Public Ledger (designed by Philadelphia architect John McArthur, built 1866-67). Includes the statue of Benjamin Franklin that adorns the corner of the Ledger building. View looks west from 6th Street showing the south side of Chestnut Street between 6th and 7th Streets., Title, photographer's imprint and series number from printed label on verso of stereograph., Manuscript note on mount of stereograph: Ledger Building 1867., Stereograph on yellow mount with square corners., Reproduced in Robert F. Looney's Old Philadelphia in early photographs 1839-1914 (New York: Dover Publications Inc., 1976), plate 123, without attribution., Originally part of a McAllister scrapbook of views of Philadelphia., Digitization funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-506-19-10), 2010-2012., Bartlett & French was a partnership between Philadelphia photographers George O. Bartlett and William French ca. 1867-1869.

Ledger Building. [graphic] / Photographed by Bartlett & French, Phila.
View of the southwest corner of Sixth and Chestnut Streets showing the newly constructed offices of the Philadelphia newspaper the Public Ledger (designed by Philadelphia architect John McArthur, built 1866-67). Includes the statue of Benjamin Franklin that adorns the corner of the Ledger building. View looks west from 6th Street showing the south side of Chestnut Street between 6th and 7th Streets., Title, photographer's imprint and series number from printed label on verso of stereograph., Manuscript note on mount of stereograph: Ledger Building 1867., Stereograph on yellow mount with square corners., Reproduced in Robert F. Looney's Old Philadelphia in early photographs 1839-1914 (New York: Dover Publications Inc., 1976), plate 123, without attribution., Originally part of a McAllister scrapbook of views of Philadelphia., Digitization funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-506-19-10), 2010-2012., Bartlett & French was a partnership between Philadelphia photographers George O. Bartlett and William French ca. 1867-1869.

Masonic Hall, Chestnut Street below Eighth. [graphic].
Views looking east from below Eighth Street showing the Masonic Hall at 713-721 Chestnut. The hall, built 1853-1855 after the designs of Sloan & Stewart, was razed by fire in 1886. Shows adjacent and tenant businesses, including Marxsen & Witte, china and glass (713 Chestnut); Marvin & Co., safes (721 Chestnut); E.H. Godshalk, carpets (723 Chestnut); and Wood & Cary, straw goods (725 Chestnut). Also includes views of signs on the south side of the block including the sign for Willis P. Hazard, bookseller and publisher (724 Chestnut)., Attributed to Bartlett & French., Title from labels pasted on mount and verso., Yellow mounts with rounded corners., One image originally part of a McAllister scrapbook of views of Philadelphia., Digitization funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-506-19-10), 2010-2012., Bartlett & French was a partnership between Philadelphia photographers George O. Bartlett and William French circa 1867-1868.

[Masonic Hall, Chestnut Street below Eighth, Philadelphia] [graphic].
View looking east from below Eighth Street showing the Masonic Hall at 713-721 Chestnut. The hall, built 1853-1855 after the designs of Sloan & Stewart, was razed by fire in 1886. Shows adjacent and tenant businesses, including Marxsen & Witte, china and glass (713 Chestnut); H. A. Osterle & Co., trimmings; and Marvin & Co., safes (721 Chestnut)., Title supplied by cataloguer., Yellow paper mount with square corners., Attributed to Bartlett & French., Retrospective conversion record: original entry, with edited., Originally part of a McAllister scrapbook of views of Philadelphia., Reproduced in The Print and Photograph Department of the Library Company of Philadelphia's Center City Philadelphia in the 19th century (Portsmouth, N.H.: Arcadia Publishing, 2006), p. 83., Arcadia caption text: In 1855 the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Pennsylvania opened a new hall on the north side of the 700 block of Chestnut Street, the site of an earlier Masonic Hall. The Masons occupied the top three floors of the Gothic brownstone building, designed by Philadelphia architect and Mason Samuel Sloan, and rented the first floor out to commercial tenants. Initial enthusiasm for the building faded quickly as problems with water in the basement and poorly ventilated rooms became apparent. By the time of this c. 1868 view, a Masonic committee had described the building as “a gross failure both in its plan and its construction.”, Digitization funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-506-19-10), 2010-2012.

Mercantile Library. [graphic].
Views showing the library built 1844-45 after the designs of William Johnston at 125 South Fifth Street. Demolished circa 1925. Image includes the Library Company of Philadelphia, a partial view of Philadelphia Dispensary, four horse-drawn carriages, and the block of Fifth Street between Market and Chestnut streets in the background., Yellow mounts, including two with rounded and one with square corners., Title from labels on versos of P.9260.9 and P.9573.14., One of images originally part of a McAllister scrapbook of views of Philadelphia., Digitization funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-506-19-10), 2010-2012., Bartlett & French was a partnership between Philadelphia photographers George O. Bartlett and William French circa 1867-1868.

New Chestnut Street Theatre. [graphic].
View looking northwest at the north side of the 1200 block of Chestnut Street showing the Chestnut Street Theater built in 1863 after designs by John Crump. Includes signs for Joseph M. Durr's restaurant (1211 Chestnut) at street level, Allen's furniture store (i.e., Joseph Allen, cabinet maker, 1209 Chestnut) and a concert hall north of the theater building. All of the properties have awnings shading the street level, except for the theater, which has street lamps lining the sidewalk and a broadside advertising "The Black Crook" near the entrance. Also includes trolley tracks and three horse-drawn coaches travelling in the street., Titles from printed label pasted on mount., Yellow paper mount with square corners., The Black Crook played at the Chestnut Street Theatre in Philadelphia in 1868., See duplicates: Bartlett & French (8)1322.F.29b and (8)1322.F.35i, Retrospective conversion record: original entry, edited., Originally part of a McAllister scrapbook., Cataloging funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-506-19-10), 2010-2012., Bartlett & French was a partnership between Philadelphia photographers George O. Bartlett and William French circa 1867-1869.

[New Chestnut Street Theatre.] [graphic].
View looking northwest at the north side of the 1200 block of Chestnut Street showing the Chestnut Street Theater built in 1863 after designs by John Crump. Includes signs for Joseph M. Durr's restaurant (1211 Chestnut) at street level, Allen's furniture store (i.e., Joseph Allen, cabinet maker, 1209 Chestnut) and a concert hall north of the theater building. All of the properties have awnings shading the street level, except for the theater, which has street lamps lining the sidewalk and a broadside advertising "The Black Crook" near the entrance. Also includes trolley tracks and three horse-drawn coaches travelling in the street., Titles from printed label on duplicate: (8)1322.F.29b., Yellow paper mount with square corners., The Black Crook played at the Chestnut Street Theatre in Philadelphia in 1868., See duplicates: Bartlett & French (7)1322.F.1c and (8)1322.F.35i, Retrospective conversion record: original entry, edited., Originally part of a McAllister scrapbook., Cataloging funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (PW-506-19-10), 2010-2012., Bartlett & French was a partnership between Philadelphia photographers George O. Bartlett and William French circa 1867-1869.

[New Chestnut Street Theatre]
Built 1863 based on designs by John Crump., Location: Bet. 12th & 13th, North side., Retrospective conversion record: original entry, with corrections., Originally part of a McAllister scrapbook.

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